Quantcast
Sunday, April 13, 2014

The must-have map for high-achieving Silver Lake parents & real estate agents

Click on image to view entire map

In Silver Lake real estate circles, a home with a view of the reservoirs is a big plus that can boost a home’s sales price. So is a Richard Neutra or mid-century architectural pedigree. But perhaps one of the biggest-price boosters – according to some agents – is whether a Silver Lake home is located within the attendance area of highly-rated Ivanhoe Elementary. One agent, Dan Ortega, has even launched a blog with the no-nonsense name Ivanhoe Elementary Silver Lake Real Estate focused on the area served by Ivanhoe, which is located in the north end of Silver Lake off Rowena Avenue. But what are the school’s exact attendance boundaries?  Another real estate agent, Brock Harris, had to navigate through the L.A. Unified bureaucracy before he was able to get a copy of a map of the Ivanhoe attendance area, which roughly covers the area north and west of the Silver Lake reservoirs.

It’s debatable how much value being in the Ivanhoe zone ads to a property, with buyers weighing the savings of sending their children to a free public school versus a pricey private academy. But Brock said what he calls the Ivanhoe Premium is worth about $100,000.  Of course, it’s not clear what happens to that premium when Ivanhoe kids are ready for middle school.

Related post:
Here’s a map of Silver Lake’s Ivanhoe Elementary School District. Curbed L.A.

26 comments

  1. But it’s still within the attendance area for King and Marshall, so the “Ivanhoe premium” is only temporary and illusory.

  2. If quality of education is a concern of yours:

    With the money you save buying somewhere else, you can send your child to private school if that is your choice.

  3. I live across the street from this school….. let’s just say that the parents of these kids are the ugliest drivers when they are picking up their precious cargo from the school. Parking around the school problematic and it seems to bring out the worst in them.
    Slow down and plan ahead.

  4. Parents driving their kids to Eagle Rock high in the morning are a huge problem. They drive like maniacs. Running stop signs at high rates of speed. Totally sick of it.
    Have almost been run over several times.

  5. Fellow parents- why drive your kids to grade school? Why not walk them? Oh, you don’t go to your neighborhood school. Why not go to your neighborhood school? Oh to many poor non white kids and although you “love diversity” you want to insure you and your children are circled by your “tribe” when it comes to their education.

    Doreet
    mom of a child in a neighborhood school

  6. doreet,

    This story is about a “neighborhood” school. See above map denoting neighborhood school boundary.

    Again, not everything is a class/race issue.

  7. if its a neighborhood school, why drive and not walk your child to school?

  8. “if its a neighborhood school, why drive and not walk your child to school?”

    1. It could be up to a 1/2 hour each way to walk there.
    2. These parents are probably on their way to work after they drop their kids off.
    3. It’s none of your business.

  9. It would be nice if maps like this were available throughout LAUSD, and not just for the absurdly overhyped Ivanhoe area.

  10. Dorret if you could help me to convince just a couple middle income parents of white kids in Mayberry district to bring their kids there then I would bring my lillie white, dress wearing, doll carrying shorter than any kids his age boy to kindergarten there. I’m just scared the kids are going to bully him… would love some advice on how to rally my neighbors to bring their kids to the neighborhood school. Don’t find your tribe statement constructive in any way.

  11. Mayberry Mommy, I don’t think young Latino kids are any more aggressive than young white or Asian kids; perhaps when they hit junior-high school when gangs begin to rear their ugly head, but elementary-school-aged kids are pretty similar in their behavior, regardless of ethnicity. However, if your son is wearing a dress, then it’s only a matter of time before he gets bullied or teased, regardless of what school he attends.

  12. I have no idea if there are cultural differences in aggression in young children. I would like the school to have more of a blend of kids so mine won’t stick out so much. I would also like to know that at least a couple of the kids who live on our block go to that school. Right now that is not the case. Yes, he would be teased if he wore a dress to school. Right now he only wears a dress inside and during “dress up” time but he definitely does not conform to gender norms. I’m guessing the crowd at Ivanhoe might be a tad more open to that but who knows….

    Anyhow, my point to Doreet was that if she really wants people to send their kids to neighborhood schools she might consider giving some constructive advice as to how they might feel more comfortable being the minority and grappling with low test scores (and not fixating on them unnecessarily), rather than ridiculing them for wanting to feel “safe” within their “tribes”.

  13. Mayberry mommy – your kid sounds cool. Good for him for being different and to you for accepting it (while still trying to protect him)!

  14. If you want diversity in your elementary school, try Mt. Washington Elementary. About 40% of the kids are white, 40% are Latino, and the rest asian and black.

  15. Mayberry mom-
    Call the schools to see if they have any anti bulling programs. Also talk to as many other parents, teachers and staff to see if their schools are open to folks who don’t fit into “typical” gender roles (yea I know that is hard, we have many school in Silver Lake and it is hard to make contact with folks you would otherwise not come in contact with. There are a few good web sites, my favorite being http://askamagnetyenta.wordpress.com/).

    This is a long way off, but King Middle school has a student club called the gay straight alliance. To find other schools with opened mildness, you might contact Children’s Hospital; they have a program for transgender children. I am sure they would know what schools would be more open minded for cross dressing kids (Note- I am not saying your child is transgender, but just giving you a heads up on a good resource for open minded schools)

    My daughters school has many gay/lesbian parents and about 1/3 of the teaching staff is gay/lesbian. Although I have heard or witnessed any parents having a problem with kids who don’t fit gender norms nor have I witnessed this from any of the students, I can not say it has never happened.

    And please know, I am NOT saying your child is gay, but a school that is cool with gay/lesbian folks would be more open to cross dressing.

  16. Thanks Doreet. I’ll refer back to this if/when needed. Right now he brings his barbie to preschool and nobody seems fazed and I dress him in traditional boys clothing and he does not object so it may not amount to much.

    Meanwhile, I notice that Mayberry, our neighborhood school, lists a paltry 1% white kids when every single school age looking kid I see in the blocks surrounding our home are white….do I simply go knocking on doors to ask parents why they are avoiding Mayberry? I know the test scores are somewhat low but I am sure the cultural discomfort has something to do with it as well…how do I convince a handful of parents to send kids there as a group, to better represent our neighborhood?

  17. My child is also considered white (she is mixed 1/2 Irish and 1/2 Mexican) her school also 1% white (with many of the non white kids are also mixed).

    You may want to talk to other parents as other schools who are working on getting more white kids in school. I know one set of parent – parents of two lovely redheaded children- at our school (Micheltorena Street) who are working on getting white folks to send their kids to our school (and I used the term “trib” because that is the term the white families use when they come up to me to explan to me why they are not sending their kids to Micheltorena. Please note- I have NEVER asked anyone why they send their kids to the schools they send them to. I assume they have their reasons). if you want to talk to Rebecca, teh parent who is bringing in white families (the word “middle class” would be a better one the white) contact me off this list (dorit@earthlink.net) and i will send her your email address (i don’t feel cool sending you her contact infor with out her OK). Or is you are free this afternoon, Rebecca will be at a School fourm at Micheltorena (1511 Micheltorena Street, 90026 cross street Sunset) this afternoon from 5:00pm to 6:00pm. You could bend her ear after the event (and learn a few things about Micheltorena; we are a very cool school!)
    doreet

  18. thanks for the heads-up Doreet. I can’t make it but I emailed you privately.

    The whole “tribe” thing is one touchy subject, isn’t it!

  19. To Mayberry Mommy. Have you looked into Elysian Heights Elementary. I like to consider that school as up and coming. There are great kids there and active parent involvement. Come by the school May 7th and meet some parents at the “Echo Park Stories and Enchiladas ” fundraiser. It’s not all brown and white!

  20. Hi Echo Park parent. Since my son lives in the Mayberry District that is his school. We cannot simply opt to enroll in Elysian Heights Elementary unless they have openings during open enrollment. Am I missing something here?

  21. Echo Park and Mayberry Moms- Elysian Heights would need open enrollment openings and Mayberrys principal woul dneed to grant Mayberry mom teh OK to not go to Mayberry. The only way around this is if Mayberry is a Program Improvement (PI) school. You can check out http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ap/apireports.asp to see if the school is PI or not.

  22. Echo Park Parent

    Elysian Heights Elementary always has open enrollments. I believe Clifford does as well and is also a good Echo Park school. I don’t think you would need permission from Mayberry to go. You may want to call the school’s principals to find out the procedure.

  23. to get a permit to go to another school you need to talk to your neighborhood school except when your current school is PI. I have talked to many a parents who have tried to get around this.

    And if I understand right, Mayberry Mom is interested in helping Mayberry become a neighborhood school were she can send her son. That would be way better then shelping your child to another community.
    Just my thought

  24. In my opinion, this is a scam to inflate housing prices and oh yes, the commission to the agent. We live ust outside of the (by one street). My 19 year old, now at universty) attended Clifford Street Elementrary and now my young twins are there as well. Unbeknownst to most, Clifford has API score as good as Ivanhoe and has had them for years. Why? … beacuse the schools has less than 200 students and they have quality administration and effective teachers. Middle school and high school? Forget it … its will be privtae education for the “Ivanhoer’s” as it is for any Silver Lake parent who cares about quality education (Mr. Lopez?????). So the million$ question (or should I say the $100k Ivanhoe Effect question is) … when it comes time for middle school, was the extra inflated home price worth it? No, its wasn’t.

    • Regardless of the middle school and high school (which are incredibly good btw), if you’re paying an extra $100k for Ivanhoe real estate and 6 free years at Ivanhoe and if the average private school is approx $20k / year you’re still saving 20k. If you have 2 kids, make that 140k.

  25. We call ‘em “Ivan-holes”.

Post a Comment

Please keep your comments civil and on topic and refrain from personal attacks. The moderator reserves the right to edit or delete any comments. The Eastsider's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy apply to comments submitted by readers. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>