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Thursday, November 27, 2014

Echo Park Lake: Now you see it, now you don’t

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About one million gallons of water a day have been flowing out of Echo Park Lake since the end of August as part of a nearly two-year long,  $65 million clean up project. The receding waters and emergence of muddy flats have many residents, such as Conor Collins of Angeleno Heights,  snapping photos through the construction fence that now wraps around the lake and park.   Collins, a photographer and photo retoucher, began taking pictures with his iPhone and Canon 50D when the fence went up. He is now publishing those and other photos on his Tumbler blog.  Many of his photos have been taken in the morning. “If you go there fairly early, it’s strangely idyllic.”

More photos on ConorCollins.com

Related Post:

  • Got room in your photo album for 720 photos a day of Echo Park Lake? The Eastsider

 



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  1. it sure stinks down there now. reminds me of a dirty fish tank. saw some confused Geese yesterday circling the lake looking for water. cannot wait until this is done.

  2. Wait is that wicked willy boat new ? or was that under the water all this time ?

  3. That second picture actually kinda makes me wish it was just grassy open space! (but in truth I love the lake and would miss it terribly!)

  4. Now that the lake is almost empty, the thing I find a little startling is seeing how shallow it really is – kind of a Hollywood illusion.

  5. I was surprised to see the lake drained when we drove past tonight. Why did I think that they decided to wait until Spring ’12 to drain the lake? Something about winter and the wet months ahead… Or did I imagine all of that?

  6. When will echo park be reopened to the public?

  7. The reason it reminds you of a dirty fishtank, Man, is because that is basically what it is. Organic matter either in the form of fish excrement or more importantly fallen leaves falls to the bottom and forms an anaerobic muck layer that produces hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide smells like rotten eggs.

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