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Saturday, October 25, 2014

The 17 rules of Echo Park Lake

Photo by Seth Abramovitch

Visitors who come to Echo Park Lake on Saturday for its grand reopening celebration will come face to face with some new signs (see the close up image below) that spell out the rules of the park. How many rules?  Looks like 17 rules plus additional warnings listed  in a large sign that Seth Abramovitch photographed today through the chain link fence still circling the park.

The rules include:

No smoking
No camping
No shopping carts
No unleashed dogs
No feeding, cruelty or harassment of animals
No painting, affixing of signs or “projections”
No umbrellas wider than 10 feet in diameter
No moonbounces or jumpers without a permit

Apparently elote vendors are 0kay – for now.



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54 comments

  1. Compare with what the muni code syas

  2. soon that will be coverd in Grafiti” Echo Park Is Tagger Heaven

  3. Sorry Graffiti

  4. Should be posted in Spanish as well , yes?

  5. Trespassing during hours of closure? If it’s past dusk and I need to get from Glendale to Echo Park I’m supposed to walk around the entire lake? HA!

  6. the rules are for your safety and to enhance the enjoymentness
    of all, please obey the rulage the supreme leaders have brotten

  7. wait. feeding the animals is against the law… *feeding the ducks is illegal??*

    LAME.

    well i’m glad i got to spend my childhood engaging in that forbidden activity there. too bad for the kids today though.

    • When you feed the animals, you are enabling them. Not only that but ducks aren’t supposed to eat hot cheetos, jackass. Also, Obesity among pigeons has tripled since 1985

    • you shouldn’t feed the ducks because it’s really bad for them. no nutritional value in bread (what most people feed them). it’s kind of like me feeding my kids Dorito’s all the time because I think it’s cute watching them run around, jamming Dorito’s into their mouth as fast as they can.

  8. MariaGoosefriend

    One thing is enacting rules, the other is enforcing them. Phone rings at Rampart. “Someone is feeding the ducks at Echo Park!!!!!” Sir can I put you on hold………..

    If laws are to be enforced by self-enforcement there should be alternatives to feeding the animals white bread, hamburgers rice and other crap. One way is to sell water-fowl feed at the boathouse or even via tough graffiti laden vending machines. Skeptical? OK forget the vending machines.

    Fact is, if the Park gets tagged and no one gets the book thrown at him, why worry. What we need are some docents at the Lake who will educate the populace and turn over evidence of consistent violators to the authorities. Docents work for free. They are generally retired people looking for something useful to do. Besides the violators at the Lake hardly fall into the class of hardened criminals. Normally a polite statement will do the trick.

    I have been a regular at the L.A Zoo for the last 2 years. Most the people that you think are employees there are not. They are volunteers and docents. The Zoo could never run itself without them. If Echo Park Lake is to maintain itself as class destination, it too needs to look into establishing a volunteer police force as it looks like Rampart’s heart is not in this at all.

    • Yes! You are absolutely correct. Let’s hope something like this can be implemented and keep this beautiful park as clean as it is now for all to enjoy!

  9. Douglas Krisher

    No this. No that. No, no, no. Total BS! Are we allowed to breath? Enjoy the park? Doesn’t look like it to me!

    • Grahm Wellington

      Dude, settle down. All the rules are there for the betterment of the park. You want a park where they don’t bother you and you can fulfill that dying need to feed a duck? Alvarado / Whilshire. It’s called Macarthur Park.

      I refuse to allow my park to turn back into what it was before.

  10. The sign needs to be bilingual. Let’s face it, the majority of taggers, swap meeters, litterers, bounce housers, transients, gang members, street people, and vendors speak Spanish. They will just claim ignorance to the English language posted sign and will sue the city if they get cited.

    • Guess Spanish speaking families and couples don’t venture into the park. Oh no. I really want to check out the sign that reads: Only Spanish speaking taggers, swap meeters, litterers, bounce housers, transients, gang members, street people, and vendors allowed!”

    • Sorry dude, but as of late,( the last 10 years?) the majority of taggers are white yipsters from the surrounding communities.

  11. I agree that the RULES should also be in Spanish— and Tagalog. But let’s be real—-NOBODY reads signs anyway. I was in the park yesterday, so happy to be there after so long, and loving all the people and the beautiful new stuff. But what I also saw: many small children wading and swimming near the lotuses; bicycles, skateboards, and scooters everywhere; unleashed dogs; people smoking; people walking all over the newly planted areas; etc. OK, well, it’s the first weekend, and it’s wonderful to see people enjoying their park. I just hope community pride wins out and all the scofflaws don’t turn the park back into a junky puddle surrounded by dirt and litter before the summer is over.

    • Silver Lake resident

      Yeah, I saw loads of swimmers and lots of unleashed dogs on Saturday as well. Looks like we have rules, but no one around to actually enforce them. Is LA hoping we’ll all adopt the “See something, say something” attitude of NYC?

  12. I truly hope that Echo Park Lake is an animal habitat, as the signs claim, and that fishing will be prohibited. See fishing mars the experience with my kids, and takes food away from ducks and geese. I just read that over 60% of catch and release fish die in a few days. It would be nice to see a park where there is actual inter-species cooperation.

    • Kirby derby, fishing doesn’t take away food the ducks. Ducks dont eat catfish. And fishing has always been allowed in the park. The lake is not some hermetically sealed vacuum. Its a living breathing thing. My only peeve with fishermen is that sometimes they leave their hooks laying around. Jeez louise, don’t these yipsters know anything about nature?

  13. I meant “Seeing fishing”

  14. Sorry Kirby but you’re far from accurate on D&R stats. The studies I’ve seen are over 90% survival rates, including the famous Yellowstone study showing cutthroat trout being caught and released an average of seven times a summer. Handled correctly and taken with barbless hooks fish survival is quite high.

    Ducks and geese? Really, do you believe they regularly consume fish, where did you hear this? Seems to me they have little chance of eating fish unless the fish are dead or somehow crippled/injured, so I wouldn’t be concerned with that. In my decades of fishing and living around Echo Park I’ve never seen a duck or goose ‘eat a fish,’ or even peck at a floating carp carcass. They seem to go out of their way to avoid them.

    Fishing is returning to the lake and I will be there to assist a kid’s fishing club. I aim to teach kids about the out-of-doors, show them how to fish, how to handle a caught fish that will ensure survival, take a quick pic and then release it back into the lake.

    Anyone is welcome to join or help out, no money is needed (I have enough gear to outfit a club) and it is the least I can do for the lake that began my fishing career. Started with a cane pole, now fly-fishing with split cane rods. And with total catch-and-release.

    Heading to Idaho famed Snake River next week, and when I return I’ll be at the lake on the north end with a table and lit to get started on the club. Hope to meet you if you stop by.

    • Circa late ’60s early ’70s we used to fish in the lake at least 3 times a week after a hard day’s work. We had 6 poles going. Our 4 kids loved it! They learned to clean & cook our catches after we got home. A great way to chill out with the fam.

    • If the city allows fishing at this municipal park, they are making a big mistake. The Cutthroat Trout you mention are 6 to 40 inches in length, thus the median length is over a two feet. I cannot imagine the the fish in Echo Park Lake are nearly this big. I hope that you are not citing a “90 percent” survival rate of injured fish to these children. Are you? And who is footing the bill for these fish to be restocked in the lake? Incidentally, Wikipedia states “Several native subspecies of cutthroat are currently listed as threatened, generally due to loss of habitat and introduction of non-native species.” You are not teaching children a respect for nature and wildlife, but rather how to thoughtlessly exploit nature. Our city’s youth would learn more by studying wildlife, a feat which is made difficult by kids viewing images of animals in captivity, being killed, or as is the case at sanctuaries or marine preserves—even in the Channel Islands—habitat being mired by fishing poles and spearing. With 60 billion aquatic animals killed by humans a year, and many areas now devoid of any large fish, our efforts should be used to enjoy fish swimming freely, not gored by metal hooks or nets and bloated in buckets. The sight, smell, and attitude of those fishing is frustrating to the park’s overall mission.

      • I see you Googled up trout stats, thanks. But the pt. is that fish survive, and well, if properly hooked with barbless hooks, played and handled and released. I do it all the time, in fact just returned from the beautiful Sierra, where I caught and released a lot of brown and rainbow trout. Kids should have the op to learn the wonderful sport of sport fishing, esp the urban ones — which I once was, and at good old Echo Park Lake.

        No one will foot any bills if the lake is restocked with sustainable fish, such as bluegills and bass. It would be a win-win for sport fishers and kids.

        • As discussed elsewhere on this site, the state “Fishing in the City” program plans to stock this lake with trout and catfish in the winter and summer, respectively, on a put-and-take basis. Water testing will be done first to establish safety. The eventual goal will be a return to the black bass fishery (bluegill and largemouth bass) that the lake had historically, though there is not currently any timetable for this. Source: I called them and asked.

          • I hope that someone will speak for the fish. As an historian, can I please ask that you refrain from using the term “historical” in regards to fishing there. You are assuming that our science about non-human animals has not evolved. I believe the park has a new mission as animal habitat (as the signs and tax money will attest to). One more favor: What politician or park service do we call about the lake? Can you let others know?

          • I’ll speak for the fish since they can’t

            — “We have been in Echo Park Lake before it was named that. It used to be Resevoir #4, and compared to the old, murky days it’s like a swimming pool now. I understand we will be caught and carefully released by eager young, urban anglers, under the guidance of experienced outdoors types. Hey, I’m just a sport fish and this seems to be my lot in life. Not much harm done, I swim away and in about 20 minutes I forget the whole experience. Am built that way.”

            “See you soon, on the end of a line,
            The Incredible Mr. Limpet.”

      • Kirby, you dum dum. I was at the lake when a guy caught a 30 pound catfish. A week earlier, my neighbor caught a 22 pounder. This was around the early 1980s, because the Parkside Journal was still around. My neighbor threw his fish back, but sadly, the 30 pounder was eaten. That big boy must have been 40 years old. And you claim to be a “historian”, but you know precious little of the history of Echo Park lake, or the fishing programs and protocols of the Parks and Recreation, or the mission, both past and present, of said organization. I somehow get the feeling that you have never been exposed much to the outdoors, both as a kid and as an adult.

  15. This sign is a joke. I have been to the park every day since Saturday. Each day I see someone smoking, drinking and swimming in the lake.

  16. Wait… people are swimming in the damn lake?

  17. No amplified sound systems without a permit in the park. But yet, Divine Saviour Catholic Church, 90065, gets to use their amplified sound system without a permit and be as loud as they want whenever they want. That is unfair.

    Oh, the law exempts churches, so just say you are church and you can blast your amplified sound system. Anyone want to challenge that law?

    • Churches are not exempt from noise ordinances. Complain to the police. They must comply just as everyone else. If the police tell you otherwise they are wrong just go over their heads to a SLO.

      • I have spoken to my SLO, several of them over the years. And, one SLO wrote the church a letter of support on city letterhead for the church to take me to court. Father Marco Oritz took me to court and lost. He had no case.

        I have spoken to the new chief at Northeast and Ex-Councilmember Ed Reyes and the Ex-city Attorney. All have said I am out of luck. They can not and will not do anything about the church amplified sound system. Oh, and neither will Father Marco Ortiz and/or his church. They say “one person does not count”.

        The law needs to change. It uses the word “exempt” but it is a word taken out of context. LAMC Chapter 11, Article 5, Section 115. Read it. It is in violation of California Penal Code 415.

        Anyone know of a good attorney?

  18. Darrell we agree with you. Hope i can bring my toddler soon and learn something from a fellow angler.

    • Thanks Acts, look for an info table near the Boathouse, south side near restroom structure — I found a Japanese carp banner that’s intended to be flown on Boy’s Day, for us it will suffice for girls and boys.

      Again, all free to whomever would like to handle a pole, bobber and line. This will be true Huck Finn fishing with cane poles I will build up, no rods and reels (unless someone brings their own, then artificial Powerbait worms will be provided).

      If a child can hold a stick and lift, they may fish. All hooks will be de-barbed, allowing for easy release of fish. To trade on the old backpacking rule: We’ll take pictures, and leave the fish.

  19. Does anybody remember Tom Sawyer/ Becky Thatcher Days at the park? Lot of fishing going on back then. IOne year I wore a straw hat and overalls, bare feet and all. Weeeeeee!!!!

  20. Hey garagehero, Acts, and DarrellKuni or any other 1950s era anglers: You should read the article about new research regarding how fish feel pain: http://freefromharm.org/farm-animal-intelligence/why-we-have-no-compassion-for-fish If the Department of Parks and Recreation were to consider fishing, which I cannot believe they would, this could not be ignored.

  21. FYI, I’m an angler who believes fish, animals in general whether one-celled or complex, and some plants can indeed sense discomfort and pain. I think it’s simple evolution — you cannot survive unless you experience discomfort and/or pain. I’ve made this point to fellow anglers. Salmon would not have made it to today if they kept trying to run up lava flows.

    I encourage and practice a strict catch-and-release ethic. I use barbless hooks that cause little damage, and briefly hold a fish for a photo, then release.

    From what I’ve read — and I’m not going to post links because, like you, my links are likely biased towards my personal beliefs and convictions — fish forget getting caught in about 20 minutes. Sometimes sooner. Fly-fishermen have caught fish they released earlier in the session. There will be fishing in Echo Park Lake, as in the other urban lakes of Los Angeles, Lincoln, MacArthur and Hollenbeck. FYI, I’ve been visiting those lakes recently to get a perspection on urban fishing in town, and can report there are regulars at all those parks.

    If I were a concerned person I’d go there and check out the aquatic and avian situations, do something now where doing good would indeed do some good, instead of projecting ahead.

    • DarrellKuni you make a weak argument and are constantly citing “statistics” such as this one that you posted earlier:

      “The studies I’ve seen are over 90% survival rates, including the famous Yellowstone study showing cutthroat trout being caught and released an average of seven times a summer. Handled correctly and taken with barbless hooks fish survival is quite high.”

      Huh??? Where are you getting this from? First, you do know that most of the people in the neighborhood that used to fish actually kept the fish in a bucket and presumably took them home. And second, even if the survival rate was 90%, which it is not, why on earth would someone pluck a fish from its habitat (water), yank out a metal hook from its lip, photograph its frightened body with their I-phone (as if its some kind of trophy or specimen), and throw it back in the water? How many times would this happen to one fish in its life at Echo Park Lake? Its all for your enjoyment you say??? This is the poorest form of wildlife watching I have ever heard of. Why not experience something less evasive? Why not try sailboating or scuba diving to view fish and marine mammals? I know some people feel the need to control nature by having pets as the only acceptable animals around, but how about bird-watching? With no tangled fishing lines, the lake is good place for that, at least when the boaters are not too loud.

      • DarrellKuni you make a weak argument and are constantly citing “statistics” such as this one that you posted earlier:

        “The studies I’ve seen are over 90% survival rates, including the famous Yellowstone study showing cutthroat trout being caught and released an average of seven times a summer. Handled correctly and taken with barbless hooks fish survival is quite high.”

        Huh??? Where are you getting this from? — GOOGLE IT UP, BRO.

        First, you do know that most of the people in the neighborhood that used to fish actually kept the fish in a bucket and presumably took them home. — ER, I KNOW PAL, GREW UP HERE, WHERE ARE YOU FROM? DID YOU EYEWITNESS THIS, OR READ ABOUT IT, BECAUSE I DOUBT YOU’RE A NATIVE ANGELENO, OR YOU WOULD KNOW THAT LOTS OF LOCALS EAT FISH FROM THE URBAN LAKES AND FROM THE COASTAL WATERS, MOST OF WHICH ARE NOT HEALTHY PLACES TO GET FISH FROM FOR THE TABLE. WE SOLD CARP TO THE CHINESE MEN WHO CAME DOWN ON SATS TO SEE WHAT WE CAUGHT, MADE POCKET CHANGE THAT WAY. THEN, WE WENT TO THE BOATHOUSE AND ORDERED UP A BURGER.

        And second, even if the survival rate was 90%, which it is not, why on earth would someone pluck a fish from its habitat (water), yank out a metal hook from its lip, photograph its frightened body with their I-phone (as if its some kind of trophy or specimen), and throw it back in the water? — IT’S CALLED ‘FISHING.’ I DON’T HAVE AN IPHONE, I USE A REAL CAMERA. BUT THAT’S BESIDE THE POINT, OF FISHING.

        WHERE’D YOU GROW UP II: WHAT, HAVE YOU NEVER ENJOYED AN OUT-OF-DOORS SPORT? SOUNDS LIKE IT. I LIKE THE OUTDOORS, AND I LIKE SPORT OUT THERE, AND I FISH NOW AND WILL FISH TILL I DROP DEAD WITH A FLY ROD IN MY COLD, DEAD HAND. CALM DOWN, YOU’RE STARTING TO SOUND WHINIER THAN EVER AND IT’S HURTING MY EARS.

        How many times would this happen to one fish in its life at Echo Park Lake? Its all for your enjoyment you say??? This is the poorest form of wildlife watching I have ever heard of. — IT’S CALLED ‘FISHING’ II.

        Why not experience something less evasive? Why not try sailboating or scuba diving to view fish and marine mammals? I know some people feel the need to control nature by having pets as the only acceptable animals around, but how about bird-watching? With no tangled fishing lines, the lake is good place for that, at least when the boaters are not too loud.

        IT’S CALLED ‘FISHING’ III.

        Caps off. Thanks for your attention. Will be around in future should you like to learn about America’s most popular outdoors form of recreation. It’s called fishing.

        • Darrell,

          I’m not a kid but i’d love to learn how to fish if you ever want to do basic lessons for adults at the lake. I suspect Kirby is a PETA member and just doesn’t like anyone doing anything. ever.

          • Not a prob, Really, all are welcome, young and old.

            I will be doing fly-casting lessons at the park, free. And can teach basic cane pole and spin fishing techniques too. Ran into a fam this Sunday, and was sad for the kid — parents bought him a nice outfit and gear, nightcrawlers, but learned there were no fish to fish for, and they didn’t know much about how to fish. Hope they return.

            Keep watch on this space, and on FB.

  22. A better and currently situation exists at the new park on the walkways — animals are in great danger from the bike riders, who are at times riding fast w/o a care on the walkways.

    I’ve seen near misses between bikes and dogs, and it is a matter of time before one of the (small) dogs takes a serious hit.

  23. echo park resident

    what the hell is moonbouncing?

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