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Thursday, October 23, 2014

Lincoln Heights “greenway” is underway

Sandwiched between a parking lot and a tagged-up industrial building, the setting for the block-long Ed P. Reyes River Greenway is probably not a place where you would envision Lincoln Heights residents gathering to enjoy the outdoors by a stream, water fall and foot bridge.  But city officials say the one-acre greenway,  which stretches from Avenue 19 and Humboldt Street to the Gold Line tracks along the Los Angeles River,  serves as a creative example of not only building new parkland near the L.A. River but  also cleaning stormwater runoff.

In this case, the water that will flow through the middle of the Reyes River Greenway, named after the former First District Councilman, will come from the city’s storm drain system.  The water fall pumps, as well as the lights along the path that loops around the one-acre park, will be powered by solar energy collected by panels on the site.  An underground biofiltration system  helps clean and collect the storm water using a natural treatment process. Some of that treated storm water will then be used to irrigate the greenway.

The city’s L.A.Stormwater blog Program said of the greenway:

This project will enhance Los Angeles River water quality by removing pollutants (oil, bacteria, trash) from dry-weather urban runoff, provide natural habitat and community recreational opportunities, and promote the idea that urban streams are a valuable resource to be enjoyed.”

While much of the landscaping and bridge has been completed, the opening of the greenway is still months away, according to a city employee on the site.

Gold Line runs along the eastern edge of the greenway near the L.A. River.

New plants take root along the banks of the river greenway.



Eastsider Featured Event

18 comments

  1. Looks like it’s landscaped with mostly California natives. Very cool.

    • unfortunately, we have a large percentage of people who think a bush is a great place to hide their trash.

      • Yet another burst of cantankerous misery from the Eastsider’s resident curmudgeon. Glad to know you reside far away in Pasadena, which beggars the question, WTF do you care what we do in OUR communities?

  2. Just another place for bums to hang out at and take over.

    • If you lived here, you would know where the bums hang out – and if that were the only concern we designed our cities to avoid you can imagine what a hostile and miserable place this city would be (more so than it already is).

  3. Save The Los Angeles River

    Ed P. Reyes River Greenway????? Yet another project that really does nothing to restore the river and a project in an already neglected area where when this expensive project is finished and opened few will go there other than the homeless and vandals and a project that will not be properly maintained. Money, money, money, money let’s just waste precious tax dollars.

    • Huh? So because it is neglected we should continue to neglect it?

      An if by neglect you mean “spend tens of millions on road construction, park construction, and bike path construction” then I think you need to get another word out of the old dictionary – because “neglected” this area isn’t.

      The investments the Young Nak Church is making alone and the Alta Lofts would make your “neglected” tag not fit.

  4. Little by little, the river and the land adjacent to it is becoming a friendly, more park-like environment. In 20 years I have no doubt that the LA River will be a fantastic, desirable riverway that is used for all sorts of recreation. Thank you city leaders for following through on the vision and dream of an LA River that is beloved and a destination for all Angelenos.

  5. Thanks for writing this article. I have seen this spot from the gold line train every morning. For LA this is a big improvement and a step in the right direction. If the community cares then there are ways to curb transients and vandals. This is good project.

  6. almost no homes in this “neighborhood”. i like the idea of cleaning up the storm water but creating a park here is a total waste. and there are several underutilized parks already in this area.

    • There are more than 100 housing units within a two-block walk from this park. At the 1/2-mile radius (well within walking distance) there are three city blocks with multi-family housing and 4 dense apartment/condo/senior complexes.

      And really? Where are the other ‘underutilized’ parks, exactly, that you can walk to from this stretch of city? Our neighborhood has two indoor rec centers and a concrete plaza surrounded by the Home Depot parking lot, none of which are easy to walk to. I for one welcome a little breathing space.

  7. There are three homes right next to this park where the gang members and bums will love to hang out. Thanks for bringing unnecssary traffic to their location. It’s bad enough they cut the fences crawl through and live under the bridge and people do graffiti every where and I heard they don’t plan on removing it because it’s art, art my a–. They already tagged the building next to it just get ready as soon as the city workers are gone it will be graffiti central. There aren’t any gates to keep out the above mentioned after dark. And I’m sure the people in those lofts will be locked in their homes at night because you wouldn’t want to be alone in the dark in this location. Even if it has solar lights it’s not going to help you when they pull a gun on you. Complete waste of money. Could have repaired the streets or sidewalks somewhere in Los Angeles.

  8. There are three homes right next to this park where the gang members and bums will love to hang out. Thanks for bringing unnecssary traffic to their location. It’s bad enough they cut the fences crawl through and live under the bridge and people do graffiti every where and I heard they don’t plan on removing it because it’s art, art my a–. They already tagged the building next to it just get ready as soon as the city workers are gone it will be graffiti central. There aren’t any gates to keep out the above mentioned after dark. And I’m sure the people in those lofts will be locked in their homes at night because you wouldn’t want to be alone in the dark in this location. Even if it has solar lights it’s not going to help you when they pull a gun on you. Complete waste of money. Could have repaired the streets or sidewalks somewhere in Los Angeles.

  9. Former Councilwoman Ruth Galanter noted that the only one actually getting anything done these past years was Councilman Reyes with the work on the river. This is proof for all to see.

  10. jeezus haha Is there nothing eastsiders won’t complain about.

  11. Chinatowndoesart

    I live in and own several of these homes off ave 19, two blocks from the river. Maybe we should start with cleaning up the graffiti and littering problems. The local businesses (atlas carpet mill, 1028 designs, lanza bros market, ups, that junkyard, etc.) don’t even do ther part to keep their buildings maintained. They call 311 and wait for the city to remove graffiti instead of getting out there every day and doing it themselves, which would stop the constant daily tagging of “clover” over “18” back and forth every day until the city removes them. Fix the community gang and drug problems first, then work on more recreational projects.

  12. I do not follow the Eastsider— but saw the beautiful photos and I got caught up in these comments.
    I worked on this project and am speaking for myself and not the City when I say:
    Thanks to those community members who see the world in terms of opportunities, you are the visionaries who will will eventually carry the moaning masses to a better world.

    Unforseen, failures are inevitable….they are also great teachers— they offer us a chance to improve, try again, and next time to “fail better”. .
    (Ala Samuel Beckett) but so far, this project has been a success.

    The project is designed to deal with stormwater pollution, not gangs and social issues. The Bureau of Sanitation was able to add on the environmental and aesthetic elements, and to offer recreational amenities to the public for $3.5 million (where did the person hear the “tens of millions” figure?…this was highly efficient from a budgetary standpoint) The jury is out as to what the community does with it, but there is no accusing the City of frittering away these funds for bureaucratic ends…what you see is value added service, and relative to public works projects nationwide, it represents many firsts. There is no longer any validity to the claim that this underserved and park poor community has been overlooked—and this underutilized and trash filled sites that has historically been tagged with graffiti holds new stormwater treatment opportunities that graffiti cannot derail.

  13. This project hasn’t had anybody working on it for months now and the gates to it are still locked. Gil Cedillo is holding the project hostage to install electric trash cans.

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