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Monday, November 24, 2014

Going, Going, Gone: Echo Park Craftsman demolished

Demo work begins on Wednesday/The Eastsider

Less building, more rubble/Rebecca Dessertine

Not much left by this afternoon/ Jeanne Wyshak

It did not take long for demolition crews and some heavy machinery to tear apart a 101-year-old Craftsman-style apartment building in Echo Park. The demolition began on Wednesday morning and continued today as passersby stopped to take photos as the two-story building at the corner of Echo Park and Park avenues was reduced to a pile of splinters.

The building  avoided being torn down in late 2010  to make away way for a new retirement apartment complex at the corner of Glendale Boulevard and Park Avenue.   Following talks with the city and the Echo Park Historical Society,*  the Foursquare Foundation,  owners of the structure, agreed to move the apartment building three blocks to a temporary site at the corner of Park and Echo Park avenues until a buyer and a permanent home could be found.  But after a potential buyer failed to have  the Craftsman relocated,  the owners moved ahead with the demolition of  the apartment house.

* Jesus Sanchez, Publisher of the The Eastsider, is a board member of the historical society



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22 comments

  1. Aldo Thee Apache

    Thanks again Angelus Temple for paving over Echo Park history!
    As Jesus™ would say ‘Needz mor stucko!’

  2. so much for history…..

  3. Good riddance. No more having to explain that eyesore to friends as they enjoy EP and the lovely lake across the street. For all those complaining about “the church” and that “they” should have saved the building, well, it sat there empty for years; you could have bought the place and moved it anywhere in LA that you wanted to. What was stopping you?

  4. My not being a billionaire got in the way of me buying that and putting it anywhere in L.A. I wanted to.

    • I doubt it needed a billion dollars to move/renovate. Maybe you and some friends could have started a non-profit org and raised some money? Donated some land? Baked some cupcakes to raise funds? If you want EP to stay static like some museum diorama, you need to take action.

  5. Twelve Words or Less

    So much for history? Wrong. Not all “Old” things are “Historic”.

  6. A Homeless Gentleman

    Dear Lord that was my HOME! Now I am homeless. What do I tell the wife??? Help m,e.

  7. I see. “…So much for history? Wrong. Not all “Old” things are “Historic”…”.

    And you grew up where? Moved here when? Won’t say sorry to begin sentence, but sorry, I love old L.A. homes, schools, trees, parks and businesses, and losing them — regardless if they are from 1875 or 1975 — diminishes us.

    So, where do you hail from? I hail from here, this is my hometown, and I like it and don’t want bits of it disappearing.

    • So basically you’re that old dude who hates change. The LA you grew up in was very different from the LA of 40 years prior. If you go back over the past 200 years, any slice of LA in 40 year increments woud show a very different city. Sorry, but this old eyesore not gaining a buyer won’t stop the world from spinning. Things change, and your being born/raised here doesn’t make you immune to it.

      • I agree, I am familair with the lady who moved the building from its old location 2 blocks away, saved it once but it could not be saved a second time.

        LA does change every 40 years dramatically

      • So basically you’re that old dude who hates change. *Not all change is good.

        The LA you grew up in was very different from the LA of 40 years prior. * Of course, want to try replying with something a tad more challenging?

        If you go back over the past 200 years, any slice of LA in 40 year increments woud show a very different city. *And all change has been good, like the elimination of the world’s finest inter-city light rail system? ‘Course, I’m just and old dude so what the crap do I know..l.I know this: the good old days were indeed gooder. We never heard gun shots, people in stores thanked your for your patronage, try getting a thanks from today’s dude or dudette at the Mac’s on Glendale, and rush hour lasted one freakin’ hour.

        Sorry, but this old eyesore not gaining a buyer won’t stop the world from spinning. Things change, and your being born/raised here doesn’t make you immune to it.

        *So tear it all down, eh? Okay, go right on ahead and love the livin’ in the souless boxes now appearing all over town, from Hollywood to EP and Downtown. Born and raised here, proud of it, and interesting how marked more interesting homegrown Angelenos are, compared to tooth-whitened newcomers.

        Not saying you’re one of them, but you prob are.

        • Corrected:

          So basically you’re that old dude who hates change. *Well, you young and restless whippersnapper, not all change is good.

          The LA you grew up in was very different from the LA of 40 years prior. * Of course, want to try replying with something a tad more challenging?

          If you go back over the past 200 years, any slice of LA in 40 year increments woud show a very different city. *And all change has been good, like the elimination of the world’s finest inter-city light rail system? Am a student of my hometown’s history, from ethnic relations, to water, to real estate, to media, to theatre, to its environs including good old Echo Park Lake. Will say again, this is my hometown, don’t like to see it parcelled into the dumpster piece by piece.

          ‘Course, I’m an ‘old dude’ so what the crap do I know. I know this: the good old days were indeed gooder, and I mean every letter of that. LA in general had a better class of peeps in it back in the day. And I mean every word of that sentence.

          We never heard gun shots, people in stores thanked you for your patronage — try getting a thanks from today’s dude or dudette at the Mac’s on Glendale — and rush hour lasted one freakin’ hour.

          Sorry, but this old eyesore not gaining a buyer won’t stop the world from spinning. Things change, and your being born/raised here doesn’t make you immune to it.

          *So tear it all down, eh? Okay, go right on ahead and love the livin’ in the souless boxes now appearing all over town, from Hollywood to EP and Downtown.

          Born and raised here, proud of it, and interesting how marked more interesting homegrown Angelenos are, compared to tooth-whitened newcomers.

          Not saying you’re one of them, but you prob are.

  8. Even I old Echo Parkster , really didn’t care to much for that ugly junky building. If I recall that building sunk one time, some people may have even gotten hurt. Good riddance, that thing is gone!

  9. to those decrying the loss of this eyesore… did you ever walk by and see the thing in question? or are you just reacting to the headline? this was a transplanted, dilapidated pile of logs covered in graffiti. it was not built there on that corner, it was not even set in the ground there on that corner; it was resting on rollers for years, sticking out like a modern sore thumb. this was not historical in any real sense of the word, and the decision to dismantle this should have come sooner.

    • Jake you obviosly have not lived in the area for long to appreciate the historic value of the structure.

      • I’ve lived here for many years but not sure how that is relevant either way. That thing was ugly from Day 1. There are a lot of properties in EP worth saving. This was definitely not one of them. That things was an earthquake deathrap waiting to happen. Good riddance.

  10. they could have disassembled it. people pay top dollar for old growth redwood, which is what they used for framing back in the day.

  11. yup. in obama’s america new senior retirement apartment complexes have to be built because more people with healthcare means more people living longer.

  12. what do shitty old buildings and the longevity of senior citizens have to do with Obama?

  13. I grew up not to far from this locaion. I remember the previous building that occupied the spot. It collapsed unexpectedly killing a man who went back to save his wife. She survived. Angelus Temple should have been more considerate of this structure before they decided to have it demolished. After all they also own a lavish home not to far from there in the historic Carroll Ave area. It’s a shame that litle by little these historic homes are disappearing. I will no longer attend services at Angelus in protest. Who knows how many other properties they own in the area that will meet the same fate.

  14. This is stupid because they are building on a top of very unsupported ground. History lesson for you new angelenos thinking you know your shit. In 1999 there was a apartment in that vacant lot and after awhile the ground became unsettled and the apartment collapsed upon having no stability and surface and people died. I hope to god that they dig that shit up pour some concrete at the bottom of that lot cuz theirs no way that the lot can hold a whole buildint

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