Quantcast
Thursday, July 24, 2014

Demo Watch: Morton Avenue house in Echo Park gets torn apart [updated]

photo (1)

ECHO PARK — An 111-year-old house on Morton Avenue looks like it is being demolished. But, at least as far as the city is concerned, this is major remodel – not a demolition.

Building permits for the house at 1708 Morton Avenue describe this project as a “ground floor addition and major remodel to single-family dwelling to create new bedrooms/bathroom in front and attached garage/laundry room at rear.”

Still, as far passersby are concerned, this old house is gone. At least some vintage concrete-like  portals – similar ones can be found on adjacent properties –  at the front of the property are still standing – for now.

photo
Update: Owner Vanessa Guillen, in a comment  to the story, disputed  the age of the age house provided by online city records and the tone of the story.  While the original portion of the home was built in 1903,  the structure was completed or underwent a major reconstruction in 1926. She said  the remodeled home will reflect a style that is compatible with the Craftsman and other original homes found  in the neighborhood.  Guillen said:

I would like to start off my saying that I am the owner of the home at 1708 Morton Ave. second the home is not 111 yrs old as the article claims. The home was built in 1920. The home was never considered as part of the historical story of echo park and since 1920 several additions have been made to the home. My family purchased the home in 1982 and have lived there since then. After much debate amongst my family, we decided to remodel the home because it was very hard to us to live in a home that contained constant painful reminders of a loved one that we lost last year and after seeing the outrageously priced homes in the area we decided that remodeling would be the only way that we could still remain in the beautiful neighborhood that we have loved and lived in for over 30 yrs.

So before you snooty article was published, maybe your writers should have done their homework and actually spoken to us, instead of posting this inaccurate, remodel bashing, and outlandish article.

12 comments

  1. Beverly D'Angeleno

    Attention Redeveloper: I’ll gladly take those posts off your hands!

  2. Don’t overreact people. You only need to leave one wall standing for it to be considered a remodel. The house was a mess. You can’t save every old house in echo park.

  3. It is not a redeveloper. The family that has owned the house since the early 80s is doing the work. If the family wants to rebuild their own house, I’m all for it!

  4. I suppose everyone should be breathing a sigh of relief that it wasn’t sold to a developer bringing echo park yet another small lot subdivision. But, as values rise, we shouldn’t think “artsy” EP is immune to mansionization. Don’t know if that’s the case with this “remodel” — but it’s a shame that they couldn’t preserve at least the front facing facade and incorporate it into the new design.

    • Echo park is definitely not immune to mansionization. I expect it to become much more frequent over the next decade, especially in elysian heights on lots on hills. I’m not against home renovation, but I wonder if we can pass regulations now similar to what west hollywood and west LA are considering, that would not let a home take up the entire lot and tower over their neighbors. I don’t know if that is the case with this particular home, but mark my words, this will start happening more and more. It’s either small lot or mansions going forward. Not trying to be depressing, I just think it’s the truth.

      • you can’t obstruct your neighbors view without their consent, which you’ll never get unless they’re senile.

  5. @theeastsider – I’m baffled by your immediate stance on the issue: “At least some vintage concrete-like portals – similar ones can be found on adjacent properties – at the front of the property are still standing – for now.”

    What makes you think what they’re doing is inherently bad? If a crappy house is remodeled that’s considered bad? Have you seen plans? Have you spoken to the family renovating the home? Why do you take a negative position against development/re-development, especially without doing your homework first?

    We can all agree that a bunch of mcmansions would suck, but there is zero evidence this is taking place. Not to mention the real likelihood is the property will look better, work better for the family and improve the aesthetics of the area without detracting significantly from other peoples lives. The negative tone here is absurd.

  6. “At least some vintage concrete-like portals- similar ones can be found on adjacent properties” The reason was one owner, you can find the story at Ghost of Echo Park, by late Ron Emler and Ms. Susan Borden. It is a nice story, sadly was neglected to the point that has been demolished I don’t see as remodeling, but well at least is not condominiums

    • Actually Hanna the story I believe you are referring to is the story of my house, next door, at 1704. House is still completely intact (and mostly like it was in 1906 when it was built), as are the concrete portals!

  7. Echo Park has a wealth of architectural beauty.
    Behind the house being torn down, glowing in the photograph, is an off-white Spanish Colonial Revival, built in 1926.
    The yard is planted with lavender and olive trees. I don’t think it is a work of art. My feeling is that you find an authentic house and authentically, try to restore it. The little Spanish hacienda at 1710 Morton Avenue is a find-a pure house.

  8. I would like to start off my saying that I am the owner of the home at 1708 Morton Ave. second the home is not 111 yrs old as the article claims. The home was built in 1920. The home was never considered as part of the historical story of echo park and since 1920 several additions have been made to the home. My family purchased the home in 1982 and have lived there since then. After much debate amongst my family, we decided to remodel the home because it was very hard to us to live in a home that contained constant painful reminders of a loved one that we lost last year and after seeing the outrageously priced homes in the area we decided that remodeling would be the only way that we could still remain in the beautiful neighborhood that we have loved and lived in for over 30 yrs.

    So before you snooty article was published, maybe your writers should have done their homework and actually spoken to us, instead of posting this inaccurate, remodel bashing, and outlandish article.

Post a Comment

Please keep your comments civil and on topic and refrain from personal attacks. The moderator reserves the right to edit or delete any comments. The Eastsider's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy apply to comments submitted by readers. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>