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Monday, September 26, 2016

Dear Eastsider: Who is Budd Wiener and why is there a park named after him?

The name “Budd Wiener” is one that makes your inner fourth-grader giggle. It’s also the name of a tiny park that serves as the primary gathering space for Monterey Hills, a master-planned cluster of more than 1,700 condos and apartments that rest atop the hills between Hermon and El Sereno. A new Monterey Hills homeowner curious about Budd Wiener could not find much info about the man:

“I did a quick search and could find no info about Budd Wiener
(the man, not the park) online. I’m thinking of calling the Central Library’s reference desk. “I can’t wait to find out about the man behind the mystery!”


The Eastsider called the Recreation and Parks Department public information office several times seeking an answer but never heard back (this certainly is not a priority item but I’m not aware of a lot of breaking rec & park news that would tie up the spokespersons.) There is no plaque in the park with the story of Budd Wiener, and even Robert Hawkes, a relative newcomer to Monterey Hills and chairperson of the Monterey Hills Federation, did not know if the park’s namesake was dead or alive. But, after checking with some fellow board members, Hawkes said he found out that Wiener had been an early Monterey Hills resident and real estate agent. The man might have lead efforts to block the construction of a convenience store amid the condos and lobbied for a park instead. But no one could recall when or exactly why the park was named after Weiner.

Jon Wittman, who has been selling condos in the area since 1998, said he was told that Wiener passed away and lived in the Marshall Villas complex. But Wittman never met Wiener and is also not sure why a park was named after him.

“It’s an unfortunate name,” Hawkes said of Budd Wiener. “But that guy is blessed with a park named after him.”

Photo from Google Maps



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One comment

  1. Budd Wiener was a major presence in Monterey Hills real estate transactions. After he died suddenly of a heart attack while waiting to meet with a client (if I recall correctly, it was the client who found Mr Wiener slumped behind the wheel of his car), the park — which I believe existed before Mr Wiener’s passing — was named in his memory. (This would have been in the early-mid 1990s.)

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