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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

A message for taggers

Someone tired of tagging in Highland Park vented their frustration on one of the few blank spaces left on this Avenue 54 wall.



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28 comments

  1. got to admit, I have often dreamt of doing this myself, although my wording would have been different.

  2. get out of my town if u dont like tagging. we just got to catch a spot. its l.a. culture like it or not. -_-

  3. hey xxplosive90026: i’m assuming you’re really young, that means your opinions will change drastically as you get older (so I take them with a grain of salt). if you’re over 20 and tagging, then you’re hopeless and selfish (and again I take your opinion with a grain of salt). how’s about I come over and spray paint your house? or maybe you can go tag your relatives houses, sure they would love to support your “culture.”

  4. xxplosive-interesting point of view. I agree, it is LA culture. BUT, I would have to limit that to murals and a few other artistic forms of tagging. A taggers made up name/crew in which nobody cares about, that isn’t legiable and has zero real artistic creativity is nothing more then just an annoying and ugly mark on the wall. Just my opinion…

  5. I think this guy or girl has the right idea, to stop tagging in and around my house in echo park I bought 2 paintball guns, and keep my paint balls frozen solid! No one has tagged on my place in years. I do invite all taggers who want to tag over for a street fiesta.

  6. I live in echo park and these kids (taggers and wangster) have no respect …our car was spray tagged! if they’re so proud of their “crew” then they should just tattoo their crew name on to their foreheads… I’m glad this person left this message for them

  7. @xxplosive90026 so let me get this straight – everyone who lives in LA should support you writing uncreative ugly-ass bullshit on their house? Wake up its not just LA culture every teenage retard on the planet tags their neighborhood from iceland to oklahoma, and that shit was played out back in the 80’s. Get the f out of here and go do something original nobody gives a shit about your ugly-ass tags

  8. I agree- the main problem is that their crap is just not creative. No one complains when someone does a clever piece of street art, but the tagging shit these kids do is just awful. They might as well be tagging the words “I Suck At This.”

    They are also breaking an unspoken rule by tagging cars, residences, and windows of businesses. I don’t get it- they’re only bringing more heat down on themselves. I don’t think we’re dealing with kids with very high IQs here.

  9. Shaun, you are my idol. I live in EP. We should get together and clean this town up.

  10. Pretty funny if you ask me. Whoever wrote this just became exactly what they despise. I guess if you can’t beat ’em – join ’em!

    People will NEVER stop creating graffiti in L.A. NEVER EVER EVER STOP.

    Not everyone writes graffiti on private property?
    and @ amused…. sorry for you but once you get over 20 is when you start getting real good! hahahahha

  11. @Ironic – I know you think we’re just lame white people that don’t like graffiti, but in truth, a lot of us love graf- it’s just that we’ve lived in a lot of other places where there’s just better talent. I have yet to see any graffiti Echo Park that I’d consider *good*, or even mediocre. Most of the crap I’ve seen is just people writing their name or the name of their crew. That style was played out 10 years ago in NYC, Chicago, London, Paris, Barcelona, etc. Writing your name, no matter how many colors or lines you use is still no better than a dog pissing on a wall to mark its territory.

    You want some respect? UP YOUR GAME. Do something CREATIVE. Make some comment on society. Be funny. Be interesting. Don’t be so goddamn BORING.

    Here’s what you’re up against in other cities:

    http://woostercollective.com/

  12. I like the idea and have just stolen the wording to cover some tags. Let’s shame these fools into making something at least a little artistic.

  13. @ Chris. I view wooster collective frequently. There is art from L.A. that appears on that site too, don’t be jealous.

    I will play devil’s advocate for one second. What many people on here are failing to understand is that street artists and taggers DO NOT CARE if you CHRIS find it “thoughtful” or “beautiful” or “creative” those are SUBJECTIVE adjectives.

    If you want to be a personal judge of what you think “good art” is than open a f*cking gallery and be choosy to your personal tastes. Host a reception and invite the whole city.

    No one dictates what is and isn’t in the streets. Take the good with the bad. Don’t rejoice in an Obey or Banksy mural and frown on a colorful spray paint piece that doesn’t tickle your self-righteous-sh*t-doesn’t-stink-attitude.

    Art imitates life. You don’t have to love it all, but don’t waste your time trying to stand in the way.

  14. So let me get this straight: its okay for you to tag the walls in my neighborhood, but not okay for me to judge it because its “in the street and not in my personal gallery”? That makes no sense. Isn’t “art” that’s visible in the public realm *more* subject to public scrutiny? I’m going to call it like I see it, and if Echo Park is full of shitty tags, then I’m going to say so.

    Like you said though- art is subjective, so no one is forcing you to listen to my opinion. But that goes both ways- you can’t expect me or anyone else to not voice their opinion just because you don’t like it.

    This is all beside the point though, that there’s a difference between street art and tagging. The point of street art is to express yourself visually in the public realm, and the point of tagging is saying “I was here.” With the exception of a few murals near Sunset + Glendale and the wheatpaste posters around the neighborhood, ALL I see here is tagging. ITS NOT ART. NOT because I don’t like it, but because the person doing it ISN’T TRYING TO MAKE ART. That’s the difference.

  15. I do not understand tagging on toilet seats. I am just saying…..

  16. The problem I have, seeing as my wall is next to this one and hit with the same tag, (and no I’m not the one that did this), is that this so-called art is on my wall, which I own. It’s also very nice to explain to my kids and the other kids that live in the surrounding houses what ‘dropping pussies’ means. And don’t try to give me the crap that I would have to explain any art to my kids, because when it’s sprayed across our front walls in letters bigger than them, it’s unavoidable. I enjoy actual graffiti art. This is not art, it’s a kid with a spray can staking claim on territory. I’m sure if I went to their house and painted it a new color, they would be pissed. Even if I thought it looked nice and was an improvement! So if they can write on my wall, is this an open invitation for me to bring the paint and brush, and update their home in a lovely shade of olive, with maybe some burgundy trim?

  17. There’s no one really wrong in any of these posts. We just haven’t considered all of the facets involved with tagging. Especially when we tie it into street art.

    Like IRONIC said “Take the good with the bad”. There’s really no other choice.

    If you don’t like street art, then there is nothing that can be said to change an opinion or give a different perspective. At the end of the day it won’t be appreciated and its all considered destruction of private/public property.

    If you are a street art fan/follower/aficionado or whatever you consider yourself, then you should understand that ANYONE who has ever picked up a can started out TOY (weak/wack/lacking talent). Graffiti is a process. When you start, you suck and hopefully you get a lot better and evolve as you go. How do any of us know that some crappy tag we’re looking at isn’t the early artwork of a new REVOK, Banksy, Shepard etc? There’s no way of knowing.

    Love it, like it, diss it, hate it, buff it or cap it but whichever you do, appreciate it for what it may become.

    —And for anyone who says they truly appreciate street art/graffiti, they should also already know that part of the art is in the CRIME.

  18. Miss Marissa Lynn

    I think the main complaint here is that the tagging is on someone’s home. It’s not on a freeway overpass, warehouse wall, or electrical box. I live in this neighborhood and the tagging is going up at a frenzied pace. Cross outs pop up before the sun has even set.
    I, like many others who’ve posted here, like street art, and follow many blogs and websites, and individual artists who contribute to this medium. I have even done some wheatpasting myself. In my opinion, the appeal of street art is actually having people see your art, to have it within the context of “real life” – instead of hanging in a box with white walls.
    What I don’t see is the appeal of marring someone else’s home. It’s not the same as property. That’s where they go to relax, to be with family, not to be constantly reminded of the gang activity that may be going on around them.
    I love Highland Park, and have chosen to live here for the past 5 years.
    I take the good with the bad as many have been putting it, but it seems like the person above just couldn’t take the bad anymore.

  19. Regardless of everyone’s individual viewpoint, I’m glad to have a dialogue about this issue on this blog. I’m also feeling inspired to do a street art blog now, so I CAN feature the stuff I like, and ignore the stuff I don’t. 🙂

    Also related to this thread:

    http://www.theeastsiderla.com/2010/06/storefront-report-4000-spray-paint-cans-means-one-stop-shopping-for-graffiti-aritsts/

  20. I TOO AM HAPPY TO HAVE AN OPEN DIALOGUE. I WILL NOT AGREE WITH EVERYONE, AND YOU MAY NOT AGREE WITH ME EITHER- BUT THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO EVERY STORY. AT THE END OF THE DAY, I AM HAPPY WITH CHRIS’S IDEA: CELEBRATE WHAT YOU ENJOY AND IGNORE THE REST.

    LET’S NOT SUM UP “GRAFFITI” AS A WHOLE WITH GANGS AND TAGGING AND STREET ART AND PRIVATE PROPERTY DAMAGES AND BRAND-NAME SPRAY PAINT.

    IT IS A WHOLE WORLD AND A WHOLE REALM WITH MANY FACETS TO EXAMINE. DO NOT STEREOTYPE ALL ART IN THE STREET AS VISUAL POLLUTION. CALL THE ADVERTISEMENTS WE CAN’T HIDE FROM THE REAL UNORIGINAL EYE SORES. PEACE!!!!!

  21. @IRONIC

    If you paint on my house, I consider it my private gallery and will judge it. Tagging is BS.

    There are plenty of places to “practice” your “art” that aren’t private property. You just gottta be “creative” to find them

  22. @ KRISTY

    WE ARE NOT JUST TALKING ABOUT “TAGGING” OR “GANG TAGS”

    LET ME EXPLAIN THIS ONE MORE TIME.

    THOSE WHO PUT THEIR ART IN THE STREETS ARE NOT WORRIED WHAT YOUR OPINION OF IT IS. THOSE WHO PUT “ART” IN THE STREETS ARE NOT THE SAME PEOPLE THAT CARRY GUNS AND TAG YOUR HOUSE.

    THOSE WHO READ THE EASTSIDER BLOG SHOULD BE WISE ENOUGH TO DETERMINE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GANG MARKINGS AND SOMEONE WHO IS TRYING TO “BETTER” THEIR URBAN LANDSCAPE.

    THIS IS PART OF HUMAN NATURE. GRAFFITI WAS AROUND BEFORE YOU WERE BORN AND WILL SURVIVE LONGER THAN YOU. THAT’S JUST A FACT. PEOPLE HAVE BEEN WRITING AND INSCRIBING IMAGES AND WORDS ON WALLS SINCE 3000 B.C.

    TRUST THE ONLY PEOPLE WRITING ON YOUR HOUSES ARE LITTLE KIDS WHO LACK DIRECTION AND WISDOM. THEY’RE STUPID AND SENSELESS- DON’T TRY AND TIE THEM INTO A PROPER REPRESENTATION OF STREET ART OR GRAFFITI. PEACE!

  23. Highland Park Rez

    I’m the person who wrote this on the Ave 54a wall.

    The tags on our wall this time were from well-known Dogtown gang members, not just street art kids. Both Dogtown and the Ave’s gangs use our walls for their turf battles, which if you haven’t been paying attention in the last few months, have grown more violent and more deadly every month.

    Personally, I subscribe to and endorse all 4 elements of the hip-hop culture; MCing, Graffiti, DJ’ing and B-Boying/B-Girling. I love and respect and promote artists from all elements and think it is a powerful force of positivity.

    What has been happening around our neighborhood lately isn’t part of the hip-hop culture at all. It is a direct representation from violent actors who have no respect for our neighborhood, no respect for our combined cultures as Angelinos of all races and ethnicities, and shows a complete disregard for our neighbors’ lives.

    Gang violence and hip-hop culture are not the same, and should never ever be confused as such.

    Peace

  24. @ IRONIC

    please lower your case.

    I get it and I’m 100% in agreement.

  25. if i catch anyone practicing their art on my house, i will put my foot deep in their ass (in an expressive way to be sure). again: GROW UP.

  26. @ Ironic

    The confusion here is that the assumption has been made that we’re angry about tagging, as in graffiti art. This was in response to a gang marking or the kid lacking sense and wisdom. The terms get intertwined. And as you say the readers of the Eastsider should know the difference, and believe me, we do, but the Eastsider himself called it tagging. We’re not trying to tie them together by any means, but we are sick of our wall being used in territory wars and by stupid kids. In fact, Kristy has brought up the idea of actually allowing ‘taggers’ to create on these walls, to prevent these bad tags. But seeing as our properties were around before spray paint, we’re under guidelines by the Mills Act and historical society, so the walls go untouched until we knock them down, or some kid with blue or red spray paint writes profanities on them.

  27. This is most likely one of the most silly arguments that we have in this city, ridiculous.

    Why do we not think about parking enforcement and more?

  28. Are we talking about gang tagging or graffiti art? The former is vandalism engaged in by scum of the earth. The latter is done by people who fancy themselves artists and can be beautiful, though beauty as always is in the eyes of the beholder.

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