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Sunday, September 25, 2016

Elysian Valley block does its part to keep the L.A. River clean

The 2400 block of Riverdale Avenue in Elysian Valley sports some new sidewalk paving stones, trees, plants and a plaque that marks the completion of a project to help clean the nearby Los Angeles River. Officials from the City of Los Angeles and the California Coastal Conservancy are scheduled to hold a ribbon cutting ceremony this afternoon for the $500,000 pilot project, which combines neighborhood beautification and methods and materials to help clean water run off before it flows into the city’s waterways. In this case, the Los Angeles River, which is located at the end of the block, will benefit from the improvements along Riverdale. How does the project do this? A press release issued by Councilman Eric Garcetti’s office explains:

“The project beautifies both sides of Riverdale Ave. in Elysian Valley between Crystal Street and where it dead-ends into the Los Angeles River with native plantings, in addition to  the addition of permeable materials and infiltration units that treat contaminated runoff before it flows into the river.”

Click on the link below to read for more details.

GARCETTI TO MARK NEW LA RIVER, OCEAN & BEACH-PROTECTION MEASURE ON WED. 9/29

LOS ANGELES — Council President Eric Garcetti will join Elysian Valley residents, theCalifornia Coastal Conservancy, other environmental advocates and engineering experts for the official ribbon-cutting of the Riverdale Avenue Los Angeles Green Streets Pilot Project WEDNESDAY, September 29 at 2 p.m. The event will be on the 2400 Block of Riverdale Avenue, near Crystal Street.

The project beautifies both sides of Riverdale Ave. in Elysian Valley between Crystal Street and where it dead-ends into the Los Angeles River with native plantings, in addition to  the addition of permeable materials and infiltration units that treat contaminated runoff before it flows into the river.

“It’s easy to forget that the Los Angeles River is a ‘real’ river that needs our protection, for its sake and for the beaches and the ocean it empties into. This remarkable initiative protects our river and ocean waters and beautifies the neighborhood at the same time. This initiative is a testament to how much we can accomplish when government works hand-in-hand with grassroots organizations and neighborhood residents,” Garcetti said.

The project is a collaboration of Garcetti, whose 13th District includes Elysian Valley;  the Department of Public Works’ Bureaus of Sanitation, Engineering and Street Services; and the California Coastal Conservancy, which provided funding.

The project is intended to pilot new standards for residential street design to reduce the pollution flowing into Los Angeles’ waterways. This location was chosen for the project because it is on the edge of the Los Angeles River, with runoff flowing directly into it, rather than through storm drains.

Photo by Tom Fassbender/Flickr



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