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Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Sure, coyotes can run but can they catch?

Echo Park resident Susan Borden was in Elysian Park Tuesday morning when she caught sight of a coyote roaming the Northeast Little League playing field near a batting cage.  Borden said the coyote appeared to be enjoying the baseball off-season.

Photo by Susan Borden



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10 comments

  1. Coyotes frighten me. But I will admit it is a good photo. Nice job, Susan.

  2. A couple weeks ago we saw a coyote cross Glendale and run up Scott Ave. We knew they lived in Elysian Park, but it was crazy to see one on such a busy street!

  3. That coyote looks awfully skinny — reminds me of like the photographer. 🙂

  4. I was driving home one evening and saw a much larger coyote at the corner of Berkeley and Lake Shore. I immediately thought about the safety of my cats.

  5. Coyotes are everywhere in Silver Lake, etc. No need to worry about them unless you’re a small dog or a cat! 🙂

  6. Certainly motivated city-dwelling coyotes can be intimidating, but the best way to counter an elevated fear of them is with knowledge. These are dynamic creatures who in their natural range are far more fearful of us than we need to be of them.

    With urbanized coyotes it’s important to bear in mind that they’ve become so habituated within such densely populated environments as ours because they are so adaptable and infinitely opportunistic. But rather than fear them (or concurrently just dismissively accept them) you should be afraid and hold accountable those of us humans who provide them with an excess of opportunities to exploit. Be it access to unsecured garbage containers; pets allowed to roam free (especially at night) or off-leash in parkland; pet food and water sources left in breachable yards after dark; or people who directly offer them food (the worst if well-meaning culprit), there are too many reasons for coyotes to walk among us.

    I have had a variety of close encounters with coyotes going back to my early teens (which would be sometime between the demise of the dinosaurs and the dawn of the internet). And what I know is this indefatigable and amazing species plays an important role in our ecology and deserves both our respect and our diligence.

    PS. Sorry to get all long-winded and preachy, but the misperception of coyotes is a topic I can’t help but address.

  7. just saw one in broad daylight on the short street at the end of the reservoir whilst jogging last week. it was totally unafraid and casually trotted down the middle of the road, keeping a close eye on me

  8. Ryan that Reservoir Coyote is one I see a lot, a totally cool customer. A few months ago s/he trotted out of the bushes, took a sharp left, waited to get to the crosswalk, crossed in front of bemused police officers in their car and then went about his/her day.

    I feel pretty lucky to live in an ecologically diverse part of LA.. .

  9. You say they aren’t dangerous, but I saw one trying to blow up a roadrunner with dynamite.

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