Monday, October 24, 2016

Exhibit showcases the ideas and innovation of Silver Lake exhibition space


Phalanstery Module | Materials & Applications

By Jim Schneeweis

An exhibit that surveys more than a decade of experiments in landscape and architecture  at Silver Lake’s Materials & Applications opens on Saturday, January 25 in the University Art Museum at Cal State Long Beach.

Materials & Applications: Building Something (Beyond) Beautiful: Projects, 2002-2013”  covers the center’s first groundbreaking party to  present works with models, prototypes, installation components, rare images and more items “that reveal a multifaceted inquiry into the potential for new and underutilized approaches to transform the built environment,” according a Materials & Application press release. “From the cutting edge of smart materials, robotics, and computational design; to the underutilized traditional materials of bamboo, felt, and pressure-formed plywood, a handful of the California’s top young architects helped cement M&A as a hotbed for innovative ideas.”

The exhibition features some of the most active names in California architecture, including Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues; Marcelo Spina; Oyler Wu Collaborative (Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu); Jimenez Lai; Rob Ley; Doris Sung, with Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter and Matthew Melnyk; Gail Peter Borden; Layer (Lisa Little and Emily White); FoxLin (Michael Fox and Juintow Lin), NONDesigns (Scott Franklin and Miao Miao)and Brand Name Label (Gabriel Renz), Axel Kilian, and Darius Miller; Jenna Didier with Ian Quezada and Daniel Ash; Anja Franke, John Southern, and Nick Blake; Edmund Ming-Yip Kwong; Eddy Sykes; Workshop LEVITAS and Didier Hess.

Organized by UAM Curator Kristina Newhouse, the show runs until April 13. Click here for more information.

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Bloom | Materials & Applications


Maximillian’s Schell | Materials & Applications

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