Sunday, October 23, 2016

Echo Park gang injunction meets with a sign of resistance

Anti-gang injunction tagging on Scott Avenue | Mark S.

A L.A. Superior Court earlier this month dismissed a legal challenge against the Echo Park gang injunction, which went into effect last year. But apparently not everyone is happy about the court order based on the “Fuc The Injunction” tagging that appeared on a retaining wall on Scott Avenue near Mohawk Street.  The large tag was spray painted   in recent days, according to a Silver Lake resident who snapped the photo above on Saturday morning.

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  1. LOL. Thank you gangmembers for reminding us why we need the injunction. Why do they use that retarded-looking font? I will be glad when the last of these guys moves East and leaves our property alone.

    • Hey Bro, why do they have to move East? You know you can express your opion without being Hateful. No wonder why these kids dislike you new comers…..

      • Hey Joe, maybe it’s because that’s where a lot of people who are leaving Echo Park and the surrounding neighborhoods are moving? How is stating a fact being hateful? Way to be accusatory over something that isn’t even there.

        • I think you’re being disingenuous if you think telling someone to “move east” doesn’t have some questionable (racist) undertones, especially considering the population of East LA is primarily low-income and Latino. Don’t you think?

          • no, we don’t think. about five minutes ago (i.e., early February) we all read the LA Times news story about echo park gang members moving out and coming back to visit echo park on the weekends to vandalize property, also known as tagging. high in the lede graphs, the article specified the neighborhoods they were moving to, apparently on data from the police, and the neighborhoods listed were, um, EAST of echo park. this poster has clearly read the stories and is echoing (no pun intended) the wording…

            “They ride in from El Sereno, Eagle Rock, even the Inland Empire, to hang out. Each Monday, trash cans and stops signs wear fresh [ExP] graffiti…”


            the last i checked there were loads of free, cool activities these individuals could do on the weekends. better yet, they could spend $50 and enroll in a community course meeting on the weekend, to learn a trade, study an art form, or complete pre-college requirements for those yearning to pursue a university degree or a profession. and the last i checked, no “racists” were stopping them from pursuing these cool options on their weekends.

          • @elizabennett – Interesting that you apparently understand the inner workings of other commenters’ minds. I think you’re giving that particular person a little more credit than their comment deserved (also, point of clarification: Eagle Rock is north of Echo Park)

      • You mad bro?

      • exactly. The new comers aren’t even the slightest bit respectful. They walk around like everyone is beneath them and completely disregard the people who have been residence of the area for a long time. It’s funny how he’s on the computer running his mouth but knows him and his wife need this injunction to feel safe in the neighborhood. I wonder how many white people are shitting bricks being in Echo Park with no power right now.

        • And tagging a wall like this is being respectful?

        • Echo Park resident

          And your racist, stereotyping comments ARE respectful? Do you see the irony in you painting “newcomers” with such broad strokes? You’re doing exactly what you’re suggesting others are doing to you.

          Whatever happened to giving people respect in the hopes that you earn it back? Honestly, a majority of my “long time resident” neighbors have been bigoted and rude towards me, even when I am friendly and attempt to reach out.

        • Beverly D'Angeleno

          justsaying, wow… pobrecito, you are really insecure!

    • gentrification = economic ethnic cleansing

      everyone here needs to take a step back and remember if you just moved here, there was a cultural existence before hipsterdom, now that existence may not have been your idea of home but for many it was and believe it or not we were o.k. before all this.

      gang injections are used as a means to end that end being to solidify the idea that this neighborhood needs it to curtail violent acts being committed by as one of the posters here ‘terrorists’

      I am a property owner in Angeleno Heights for many years and I am saddened by the so called improvements, where was the effort to beautify or create a more safe living environment 10 years ago why now! Is it because a new demographic has showed interest here?

      That new demographic is just as messy, loud, possibly dangerous, users of alcohol and/or drugs as any citizen that lives here only with a hint of entitlement and arrogance.

      Now before you get all ‘OH MY DANGEROUS!’ I have witnessed fights and other altercations up and down Sunset and Echo Park Ave. So please save it. It is merely a comparison.

      So tell me because that demographic has possibly different tastes and color skin than the one they are attempting to replace is that really enough to justify such actions.

      My question to all who moved here, what happens when Echo Park is not gritty enough and becomes even more higher priced than Los Feliz or Silverlake?

      WATCH OUT HIGHLAND PARK AND LINCOLN HEIGHTS, I hear they are already in your neck of the woods.

      In conclusion I understand my opinion may seem backwards to progress but I leave you with this thought,
      How many hipster conversations start like this, “wow this place still has so many of them when are they going to figure it out?”

  2. We’ve gone from F the Police to F the Injunction. LA’s criminal youth is getting more intelligent over the years.

  3. Ah a public education at its finest

  4. Echo Park resident

    I’m tired of these moronic gangbangers who have nothing better to do than vandalize private property and harass law-abiding local residents. If they have an issue with the injunction, how on earth will tagging an innocent person’s house bring about any sort of change? At this rate, these idiots are only digging themselves deeper into a hole; bad behavior only justifies the existence of the injunction.

    Hey morons: Have a problem? Start a petition. Write a letter. Make a phone call. I see you dorks on your smartphones — why not Google the phone number of your Councilman and, oh I dunno, try to make your concerns known in a more civilized and respectful manner? To earn respect, you need to show respect — and at this rate, no one in Echo Park, be they white or Latino or otherwise, has respect for people like you.

  5. PLEASE BRING THE GANG INJUNCTION TO VIRGIL VILLAGE! Every single night the Virgil Village gangs destroy our neighborhood. And believe me, they know that the 311 service is closed on Saturday and Sunday… they use Friday as a time to really intensify their tagging because they know it will be up for the entire weekend. I have seen these pudgy dirtballs tagging in broad daylight. I feel so bad for our residents and shop owners. Please, LAPD Rampart, we need you more than ever in Virgil Village. I have written emails and called numerous times, and the tagging is only getting worse! The entire McD parking lot at Vermont/Melrose is completely tagged— again. The entire stretch of Virgil Village on Virgil Ave— completely tagged— again. It is non stop. They get my driveway, my neighbors HOUSE— they get our trees, our TRASH CANS! Who is claiming trash? Oh that’s right— these trash balls. If you are against the injunction you belong in jail as well. Get rid of these human cockroaches. Please help!

  6. This guy’s/kids dont learn, A lot of vandalism all around the area with the same usual tags”CYS ” Mayberry Crazys” etc… I seen it as far as Coronado/Temple and also around Scott/Echo Park. Lately I have noticied 3-4 younger looking kids walking around in the daytime and they do look pretty scary. I have learned through out the years to keep a bucket of paint at home and lock my doors at night. This to shall pass!

  7. I’m not a fan of gangs, but as a long time EP resident, I will say some long time residents are not mixing well with these new hipster residents. Many former long time residents have been priced out of EP, and they’re angry about it. Also, some skinny jean wearing whitey’s are just plain rude and arrogant. I don’t appreciate it in my hood.
    To quote Zack de la Rocha: “These people ain’t seen a brown skin man since their grandparents bought one.”

    • So the solution to this “anger” is to destroy public and private property? This is not helping their case.

    • Echo Park resident

      Jesse, it’s a two-way street. Unfortunately, I’ve been subject to discrimination, rudeness and stereotyping by my longtime resident neighbors. It hurts, and frankly, I do not know what else I can do to fix or even address it.

      The hostility isn’t even just restricted to “white” people; if you look a certain way, you will be treated rudely. I am Hispanic, and my boyfriend is white. We are in our late 20s. When we moved in several months ago (from another part of Echo Park/Silver Lake) we made a point to introduce ourselves to our neighbors and invite them to a BBQ. Most of our neighbors are Latino families, and we are the only people our age on the block. With the exception of one family, every single neighbor we met was hostile and outright mean to our faces. One man even told us that he was going to do everything possible to get “you rich white people” out of the neighborhood. My family lived in Echo Park in the 60s when they immigrated here from Cuba. Hearing that I wasn’t welcome to live in an area my family called home for a long time was definitely a slap in the face.

      Frankly, I don’t even know what a “hipster” even is. My boyfriend and I both work really hard at our jobs. We are not rich by any means. Our families are not rich, nor do they support us financially. We moved to Echo Park because we love the neighborhood, its history, and its diversity. I do not think that, just because we dress a certain way, that means we should be treated poorly by our neighbors.

      • I’m sorry to hear of your failure to reach your neighbors. Trust that not all long term residents are the same, if you’re kind to me, I’ll be kind to you. Unfortunately, not all new residents are as friendly as you and yor boyfriend. Good luck to you.

    • Yes, I’m sure the long term residents really miss the gang “protecting” their hood, mattress leaning up against every phone poll and decorative refrigerators in the front yard…. Take care of your neighborhood before someone takes care of it for you

      • Moody – I was a victim of gang violence growing up, and my street had it’s share of trouble. So it says a lot that I am willing to put up with “mattress leaning up against every phone poll. It may seem ghetto to you, but it was home to me. You wouldn’t understand.

        • It’s does say a lot that you’re willing to put up with a mattress against a light pole. One of the main things it says is that you don’t have any pride in your “home”. Anyone that has pride in where they live wouldn’t stand for it, and would have it removed ASAP. The second thing is says is that you’re lazy. Same explanation. Someone dumped a mattress in my (previous) neighborhood on a Friday. Knowing that the city wouldn’t pick it up until at least the following Tuesday, I loaded that flea infested thing in my truck and took it to the dumpster.

          Thanks for letting us know what you stand for.

          • So…are you calling me a lazy Mexican? You’re just the type of new resident that I’ve been referring to in my comments, thanks for proving my case.
            Also, the comments about the mattress leaning against a phone pole were meant to describe an Echo Park from years ago, when EP was known as a gang community and the population was about 75% hispanic. I was probably too young to do anything about any mattress or refrigerator, but that’s besides the point. Again, thanks for proving my point about new EP residents.

          • You’re welcome.
            Now get off your lazy butt and go clean up your neighborhood.
            Then, go see someone about your racial inferiority complex.

    • Jesse, before you start quoting some of Rage Against the Machine’s more incendiary, race-baiting lyrics, let me tell you a brief story: In 2004, when I was working in real estate, two clients and I visited an $850,000 listing on Ivanhoe Drive in Silver Lake. Guess who else was checking out the listing? Zack de la Rocha. I approached him and told him I liked his music, and he said thanks, and we went our separate ways. It struck me as odd that someone whose lyrics were so Marxist and pro-revolutionary would be searching for a home in such an upper-middle-class suburb rather than in the barrio with the “raza.” The point is, despite his rhetoric, he doesn’t want to live among gangs more than anyone else does. Incidentally, your post smacks of racism; just substitute the name of any other ethnic group for “some skinny jean wearing whitey’s” (sic) and try to defend your comment.

      • James – My comments were clearly about race, and I find it funny that you are accusing me of being a racist when I’ve been called a beaner and dirty Mexican in the past. I’m not a gang member, never have been. But what if you saw me on Sunset wearing a Dodger jersey and cap, I wonder what you would think of me? Would you stereotype me? I wonder.

        • Lets see, because you’ve been called “a beaner” and “dirty Mexican”, it gives you license to be racist? That’s not how it works, Bro.

          • Cardenas – First, I’m not your Bro. Second, racism is hate. I’ve had my share of hate thrown at me. Apparently you haven’t, you’re fortunate. Let me assure you that you never forget hate, and it causes hard feelings. I will admit, not all of the new residents in EP are jerk offs. I was having tacos at Iriza one night after a Dodger game, and some drunken jerk offs were talking non-sense about the “Mexican” cooks in the trailer. What made this incident worse in my eyes, was their little Latina friend was laughing, just to fit in a suppose. Yes, they were wearing skinny jeans, and yes they were white. So excuse me if those types of incidents get my blood boiling, must be the hot Mexican blood in me.

      • james-

        zach de la rocha’s family is from east l.a. ever heard of los four?

        what exactly are you saying here that he shouldn’t be able to look at houses in the neighborhood he grew up in?

        did you not think silverlake had a history of ” marxist and pro revolutionaries” as you say

        los angeles does in fact have a history before you and your real estate career got here

        • I worked in real estate for a year – in between six years of teaching elementary school in South-Central Los Angeles, joining the Peace Corps and serving in West Africa, and then working 8 1/2 years as a high-school teacher in the Pico-Union area. Take your patronizing attitude elsewhere.

        • Incidentally, I wasn’t stating that Zack De La Rocha shouldn’t buy a house in Silver Lake; I was attempting to point out the disconnect between his (Marxist-leaning) lyrics and his (bourgeois) personal choices. Jesse was citing De La Rocha’s lyrics in an effort to bolster what I felt to be a racist assertion, so I decided to relate a personal anecdote that I thought would apply.

        • Beverly D'Angeleno

          1. Zach grew up in Irvine (hardly a rough neighborhood).

          2. Everyone complaining about “hipsters” invading Echo Park should be grateful for having such first-world problems.

      • I can deal with yuppies, hipsters, even gang members. God I hope Zach did not buy that house. We don’t need mainstream wannabe subversive and talentless rock n rollers like him living here.

        • I think you are confused you are accurately describing hipsters! I don’t want them here either.

          I would probably put wannabe in front of mainstream though

  8. And why are the gang injuctions only on specific neighborhoods and not just a city wide injunction. That makes the most sense.

    • I agree 100%. How gangs are even legals is beyond me. These are “domestic” terrorist groups plain and simple. If Al Qaeda wanted to form a group in Los Angeles, would that be allowed as well?

      • Sadd, you are wrong. there is a huge difference between what counts as terror and what counts as crime. Sorry for the hateful comments you had to endure below though.

  9. Hey they spelled injunction right! But not ‘fuck’?! Damn. How about those Dodgers? That’s spelled right all the time. Hey how about the Dodgers leave Echo Park and maybe the homies will follow since they love Los Doyers so much. Oh but wait the owners of The Dodgers could give a rat’s ass about some taggers, but they’ll take you and your families poor ass $$$ on baseball caps and jerseys for decades.

    When are you guys gonna put together some real hustling and figure out who’s hustling who?? Stop tagging and terrorizing your own neighborhood and really take care of your tierra!?!?!

  10. Attention, please note which Silver Lake Neighborhood Council members where against the Injunction and went out of their way to intimidate other in the community who were looking for answers and help to these problems in our neighborhood.

  11. It’s going to be a really interesting couple of years for Echo Park as it turns into a million dollar neighborhood, with these little idiots tagging up the walls every weekend

  12. if these gangs could actually create even decent graffiti I might just side with them. But clearly this is the work of idiotic teenagers with IQs below 70. calling these groups of kiddos gangs is giving them too much credence.

    In the 80s we had style wars and in 2014 we have really dumb kids that clearly skipped art class and lack the fortitude to actually make something worthwhile. pretty sad.

  13. and for anyone still opposing the “injunction” get your head checked. there is no reasonable argument to support being against gangs AND the injunction at the same time. those two things are what we call mutually exclusive.

    • You are being duped by the man, busta. This totalitarian state you advocate will end up swallowing you too! This neighborhood injunction means that any developer with enough scratch to pay of a couple of politicians will roust you out of your house if he wants it! It’s time to recognize who the enemy is, busta. It’s not the disempowered youth who’s only outlet is a spray can, or if he’s really tough, a gun. No, the enemy is the real power that is coming down on your ass with legislation, zoning variances and political clout–and a bulldozer–that’s who you’ve got to worry about!

      • That is a slippery slope you are walking there Elysian Hts.

        • please explain…

          • “Slippery slope” is a type of argument that says a final state will inevitably follow from an initial action – that the initial action will cause a chain of related events – the initial action causes things to slide “downhill” to a terrible conclusion.
            Like a gang injunction will lead to your home being bulldozed, or you will be swallowed by a totalitarian state.
            It’s possible (actually more likely) that the gang injunction will not result in anything further: sometimes a gang injunction is just a gang injunction; its not always the first step in a totalitarian power grab.

          • I’ll explain: it’s what you find yourself on after you’ve said it’s OK to withdraw a couple of constitutionally guaranteed rights from a few named citizens just for a little while.

          • elysian: the fact that gangs are a nuisance in need of tactics to cut down on property damage and general violence and intimidation has no correlation with the fact that corporations use government to gain advantages. You act like it’s a revelation that corporations use tools at their disposal to become as profitable as possible, but you are grasping at straws here because there is nothing about this gang injunction that aligns with corporate or government interests other than protecting citizens. i’m far from duped by “the man”.

            You have bought into this bogus slippery slope argument, that simply isn’t coherent. Your intentions are good I think, but you should focus them on real problems, not a gang injunction that helps protect our communities. and btw, no one’s constitutional rights are being infringed upon, courts have decided this long ago regarding injunctions, simply false man.

          • Beverly D'Angeleno

            Clearly, you watch too many movies, Ely Hts, if you equate guns with toughness. In fact, usually it’s just the opposite.

      • Wait, so Busta is the problem? I knew I didn’t trust those flowing dreadlocks and that fast rhyming! No, but in all seriousness, no, seriously, take a deep breath and relax. All will me ok…hey, swing by my sweet pad for a cocktail and some home grown and we will raise a glass to all the fallen hommies 😉

    • Yes, busta, there is a reason to oppose the gang injunction and still not support gang activity. It’s called justice. You won’t be able to count on it after you’ve given your rights of association away. Police state, anyone?

      • There is validity in the words of Elysian Hts. It is not unreasonable to at once oppose the injunction, as well as oppose gang activity. That’s why the injunction is overseen by the courts, and enforcement carried out under specific conditions. Diligence on the part of all parties is important, police department and otherwise, to ensure the scope and spirit of the injunction is not exceeded.

        [email protected]
        (213) 484-3400

        • Wes, thank you for contributing to this discussion. And I appreciate your acknowledgment that arguing against the neighborhood injunction is not an argument in favor of gang behavior. I strenuously oppose the injunction based on its questionable constitutionality (I recognize that such injunctions have been reviewed by the California Supreme Court) and the dearth of evidence that injunctions produce significant reductions in gang activity. The main reason I oppose this injunction for our neighborhood is that I see how the fear it instills is affecting neighborhood children whom I know personally and who’s family members may be subject to it. I do not want the elementary school children I know to be pulled aside in the next few years and identified as “gang related” with no hope that their names will ever be revealed, let alone removed from police data files. This is the definition of state oppression.

          I think of violence in our neighborhoods as an issue of mental health related to trauma in the home and upbringing as well as the community. Criminality, morality and law enforcement are are the watchwords of the status quo, and look where this has gotten us. We are the world’s most profligate jailers. Policies and strategies which address a core understanding of the problems are where real progress can be made. It will take a new vision of what justice entails. Conventional suppression and incarceration tactics create trauma among our young people and affected families. They serve to alienate and disrupt our community by reinforcing enemy images of local young people and offering fear, intimidation and power in place of healthy community building. They are perhaps a part of the reason that gang violence has been so intractable. Of course incarceration only reinforces criminality–there can be no pretense that it serves a rehabilitative function.

          I’m skeptical that a quasi-constitutional injunction will serve any better than existing methods for stopping crime. I have read of only very small statistical improvements in crime stats taking place here and there on the map of injunctions state wide. Largely, the evidence of improvement I’ve found is inconclusive and under-researched. I particularly object to the likelihood that young people whose names are entered on a field identification card by police will be forever subject to identification as criminal–or criminally associated.
I understand that murders and violent crime take place here. There is a continuing need for public safety officers and programs. Still I hardly believe that existing law favors criminals. Police have powerful legal and enforcement tools without the added gang injunction–which serves mainly as a mechanism to promote fear in the community and encourages divisiveness. I am heartened to learn this morning that Assemblyman Reginald Jones-Sawyer, Sr. is convening a hearing of the Select Committee on Justice Reinvestment in Los Angeles at the California Science Center this Friday the 28th from 10:00 to 12:00. This may be a start of dialogue about real changes in the justice system meant to lift up children instead of shuffling them off to jail.

          I look forward to continued conversation with you, Wes. Thanks for being available.

          • You claim the injunction is instilling fear? GTFO. Tell that to my friends who constantly have fat midget dudes asking them what neighborhood they are from. Tell that to the families of babies who have been struck by gang crossfire. Tell that to all of the residents and business owners who have to constantly paint over taggings by the animals marking their “territory”. I don’t want children of my own— let alone yours. If I did have children I wouldn’t expect the community to do anything for my children— the would be my responsibility alone. American communities are not responsible for you kids or raising them. You are thinking of Scandinavia.

          • Elysian Hts.,

            Thank you for a well-written response. I am cognizant that even though an injunction has passed legal muster on several levels, the implementation of it can take different forms as it filters down to those who enforce it. I do know we agree in that no problem can be solved solely by arrests, though that may be a quick fix.

            That is why the gang units are part of a larger collaboration which includes civil service agencies, and numerous non-profits which provide young people with opportunities and a chance, more than is afforded by gang membership. This injunction rightfully has several mechanisms for subjects and their parents to oppose inclusion, and removal once it is evidenced that the need for inclusion has passed.

            You made reference to the “slippery slope” earlier, and that is an analogy that I also use. I realize that you did not mean a single injunction results in absolute oppression, but that oppression does start somewhere. Today “we” violate the law to get “those guys,” and a likelihood exists that in the future, “we” will have run afoul of someone or some entity and now fall subject to the arbitrary tactics we exercised. Keep up the vigilance and your beliefs, Elysian Hts. I believe you and the young officers who patrol your neighborhood have many more similarities than differences.

            [email protected]
            (213) 484-3400

          • @Sadd
            Sadd, I do expect my community to look out for my children.And I expect my children to look out for the community around them.That’s the meaning of life, to me–shared responsibility and shared benefit. We drink from the same cup. Skol!

          • @Wes, thanks again for your observations. I’m sure you realize have no beef with individual cops–these are institutional inequities I’m arguing against. Structural change takes a lot of heart and a lot of thought! So I’m doing what I can to present an alternative to the dominance and suppression model, which is so ably spoken for in these comments.!

          • you get my award for smartest person on here.

          • @ H. Scott
            That’s not saying much.

          • Concerned and Interested

            Interesting thought – I guess a gang injunction could represent the “slippery slope” to a police state where our civil rights are slowly stripped from us. Gun control laws follow the same line of reasoning. If you don’t trust the government, then you want to own firearms including assault weapons because as the Bill of Rights stated:

            “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

            Ultimately, I guess it depends on your trust in our government. Will they overstep their power? Is this a slippery slope away from the personal freedom our forefathers wanted us to have? OR, is this just a case of the government trying to look out for our best interest?

            Personally, I would like the police to “protect and serve”, not merely enforce the law – by this, I mean using discretion based on enforcing laws only when necessary for our protection.

        • Elysian & Lt. Wes Buhrmester: A gang injunction on it’s own without any court oversight/controls los angeles has in place surely could be a concern. As far as real-world implementation in Echo Park and around LA there has yet to be any hard evidence leading to suspect negative outcomes from injunctions. That’s why I say opposing the injunction and opposing gangs are mutually exclusive.

          If your concern is about instilling fear in innocent children I think the lieutenant provided you very specific controls that are currently in place to handle that concern. Why do you think it’s reasonable to present your case as opposing an injunction as the only solution? That’s incredibly shortsighted and unhelpful.

  14. My first thought was that this is some white hipster’s work.

  15. Gang injunctions are probably one of the biggest reasons crime is down in Rampart, Northeast, and the rest of Los Angeles. Rampart Division used to have over 200 murders a year in the 1980’s. Last year we had less than 20. Community support is a big part of that as well.
    Sadd – I will pass your info regarding Virgil Village on to the Rampart Division Special Problems Unit as well.
    If anyone has information or issues of police concern, please pass your comments on to us at [email protected]. We also have a Facebook and Twitter page. Call 911 for emergencies.

  16. 4 year olds with crayons scribble on walls. Labeling these children as gang members only gives their silly activities merit and makes them think people are somehow afraid of them. We aren’t. I can tell you from witnessing it myself these taggers don’t go out in the middle of the night and do this. They do it in broad daylight after school or around 7pm after dinner. The pedestrian underpass at clifford and glendale gets tagged every other day and it’s only at certain hours the paint smells fresh. I’ve seen taggers at work sneakily tagging street signs or in the evening when its dark behind a fence at a construction site. These are teenagers with a curfew and a bed time. It wouldn’t be so bad if there was artistic talent behind the tagging but its scribbling their name or misspelled messages hastily painted and it makes Echo Park look grungy. I especially hate when someone puts up actual art and then it’s scribbled on. I get that it has looked grungy for quite some time and that is was a scary place to walk around at night in the 80’s and 90’s but now it’s up and coming. People want to move here because it is a beautiful area, And there are projects in the works to make it even more beautiful, I for one am excited to see the 2 freeway terminus project get underway and turn the abandoned industrial feel of glendale blvd. north of berkley into pedestrian friendly neighborhood. These kids no longer have corner turfs to sell weed on and fight over thanks in part to dispensaries taking away their after school jobs and potential gang careers, Their only option now is to pretend to be in gangs and tag things like their fathers did when they were 13. Still there are few from the old crew who will stop random neighbors and tell them how lucky they are that their “letting them” walk the block and that they are keeping them safe. I don’t mean to sound prejudice at all but when I moved to echo park 5 years ago I would hear a gun shot almost once a month. Little by little hipsters and white people and gays have been moving here discovering this towns hidden beauty and I can honestly say I haven’t heard a shot fired off in almost 2 years now. I walk the streets at all hours of the night and I will not be afraid to do so. I will never be afraid in my Neighborhood. And yes people have a right to peaceably assemble, to protest grievances, children don’t have a right to instill fear and promote hostility, vandalize, intimidate or lay claim to property they don’t own or have any right to. If they want to have the right to be in a gang they can go to jail where i’m sure they’ll find that will beat the crap out of them and let them join. The real world is not a jail. Echo Park is not a ghetto and if bangers wanna get together and make a name for themselves in their neighborhood they can start with volunteering to clean up all the trash on the side walks. They can get mentored on how to airbrush and paint artistically, they can take pride in keeping their neighborhood safe by keeping it beautiful and respecting the city they live in, It’s wishful thinking they will because if they aren’t going to do it first the people that see potential in this Eden and the people who end up moving here will and push the excrement elsewhere. Buildings are going to get torn down to make way for buildings they can’t afford to live in, the kind with surveillance cameras that catch these children scribbling on things they shouldn’t be scribbling on. And if they can’t pay the fines, make their parents. And if that causes a financial hardship then they can move and learn from their mistakes in how they raised their children and try again elsewhere. Time for change. Time for this injunction to fuc them.





    • Probably not.
      Less out of fear, more from disgust.
      Gang culture is an outdated concept.
      The human race is evolving and leaving you behind.

    • Mr. Lobo, when you write “first to blast,” I’m assuming that you’re referring to blasting the nine-year-old girl who was shot to death in her home on Kensington by gang members a few years ago, or maybe the five-year-old boy who was shot and killed by a gang member near Roybal High School. You child killers are a stain on the community, and I’m happy to say that more and more young people are realizing that gang life is a dead-end street. I might not stare you down as you pass me on the sidewalk, but trust me that society, and a good life, is passing you by.

      • Beverly D'Angeleno

        Clearly El Lobo is a poser. He’s never shot anything, except maybe a snot rocket as he cried into his pillow after the other kids at school teased him for being overweight.

    • I don’t speak gang. No clue what you wrote El Lobo.

      • spanish isn’t ‘gang’ you racist d-bag.

        • La Chingona, my apologies. I thought this was gang language. Could you please translate this Spanish to English? “YOU WANA LAST ,,, BE THE FIRST TO BLAST !!!!!” <– what does this mean? I'm sorry I'm not fluent in Spanish to understand this phrase.

          • “YOU WANA LAST ,,, BE THE FIRST TO BLAST !!!!!”

            I think he was implying that it’s some sort of sexy gang initiation thing. Maybe that’s what all the commotion is in the bushes around Elysian Park.

          • It’s not gang language at all. I just heard Bob Dole say it for the latest Viagra commercial, but it was something like:

            “You Wanna Last! [Don’t] Be The First to Blast!!!” and “Won’t Stop. Can’t Stop”

            Get Viagra

          • I though he was referring to premature ejaculation…

    • El Lobo,

      I’m gonna blast – – – my iced mocha with another shot of whipped cream that is…while I flick through the latest issue of Dwell and ponder whether I should buy a new Audi A6 or a vintage VW Bus from my Echo Park rooftop deck.

      Why don’t you ditch the gang life and join us??? More money, nicer houses, finer women 😉

      • Ah, I see your tactic: Slowly poison the gangsters with sugar and saturated fat, so that they grow so obese they can’t run from the police.


      • look how cocky and disrespectful you newcomers are to long time residents smh and you wonder why people in the neighborhood don’t like you guys. Your a guest here wether you like it or not, don’t for a second pretend like you hipsters didn’t move here and raise up the rent , kicked out most of the hispanic family owned businesses . You guys run your mouth about how hipster echo park is but fail to realize YOU newcomers made it that way . I see how you guys walk through the city at night scared, looking down at the ground when you seen hispanics so lets stop the cocky shit because your probably shitting bricks during this power outage right now.

        • I ain’t pretending’ sista. My pad drove prices up big time. But you and your friends are always welcome to stop by for a delicous cocktail and late night party. Why fight it when you can join it baby? Lets spread the wealth and happiness!

        • We are all guests on this earth, justsaying. Nobody or no group owns these neighborhoods or city. It sounds like you are the disrespectful and cocky one here.

      • The Good Life . wellington. James . MARKED !!

  18. Anyone hear those gunshots followed by a screeching car early this morning (tue) around 4:30AM? It was right here on Reservoir and Waterloo. Two blocks away from this very wall. The shots woke me up. I heard about 3 or 4 before the car peeled out. Looked out the window and saw the car flying down in a blur.

    • Echo Park resident

      That doesn’t surprise me. We lived in that area for a while before moving to another part of Echo Park. Waterloo and Reservoir is still sort of gangbanger central. There’s a string of houses that house a bunch of gang members, and they’re almost all exclusively responsible for the tagging in the area.

      Also not surprising — the gang houses are also the most dilapidated, ugly and unkempt buildings in the area.

  19. gangbangers and their imaginary ownership of a neighborhood. lol.

    You don’t want an injunction so you tag an innocent person’s house to complain about it?

    Wow, that’s a whole new level of stupid.

    Gangs… all big and bad until the cops show up.

  20. I really hope the neighborhood is not as divided as the posts here make it seem. I live happily right on the edge of Echo Park and Silver Lake, right in CYS territory in fact, and it seems people are getting along pretty well. A couple of things I feel I have to contribute:
    It is impossible to read some of the pro-injunction comments and not hear the hate and the racism in them. I am not against injunctions but I think they are troubling and I am not at all surprised by some of the hateful remarks that seem to fall along the side of supporting the injunction. Also impossible not to hear the anger from people who feel like they are being displaced. All of you are cowards for fighting about it on the internet and not attempting to find an understanding with each other in the real world. I can promise you I would offer you that if we crossed paths around the neighborhood.
    To (99% of) my fellow neighbors: chances are when you try to qualify what is good and bad graffiti you are being a dilettante. I am glad you saw a documentary about Banksy but please shut up.
    Also, it isn’t the “hipsters” who are the problem. They have been here since the beginning, and are just this generation’s version of the kind of creative bohemians that help to create this area’s identity. Also that whole thing did kinda peaked already. You are looking at lizards and calling them dinosaurs. Can we please agree it’s the fucking yuppies and leave these skinny kids alone?

    • Thanks, H. Scott for pointing out the racist nature of so many of the comments here. I view racism as fear. It’s a sad strategy, but understandable-not acceptable, but it’s common to lash out against the unknown. And I usually spend little time in comments sections trying to find understanding. Yet occasionally it’s worthwhile to articulate a different narrative than the one that dominates–in this case that suppressing citizens’ civil rights is just a “tool” and that everything will be OK in the end if you just turn a blind eye to this one little injustice until the streets are clean. As you suggest, it’s more rewarding and broadly beneficial to meet people on the street, at civic meetings, the library, in schools, at businesses and coffee shops and at the parks. That’s what I like to do!

  21. All you stuck up white yuppies keep talking about is what trash these kids are, what monsters they are, how they mess up your property, your neighborhood, everything…. You can’t even see these kids’ humanity, what makes them think they’ll respect you? Y’all are some racist, classist, pricks who couldn’t even put yourself in their shoes for a day, yet you rely on the undervalued labor they and their families provide. Learn to have some empathy if you want anyone to see your side of things…

    • Concerned and Interested

      When you say “kids”, are you referring to gang members – knife and gun wielding people that deal in the illegal drug trade which kills more Americans per year than the Iraq and Afghanistan war combined? Or are you talking about kids playing in a playground, sending Instagram messages to friends, and maybe, sneaking the occasional cigarette or beer? Please clarify…

    • @La Chingona

      Stop making excuses for criminals.

      Where was my humanity when a gangbanger put a gun to my head and threatened my family with death for absolutely no reason? And me having a problem with that somehow makes me stuck up & racist?

      Are they thinking about any kind of respect when they cover my garage with tags? No, they performing the same function as a dog pissing on a hydrant.

      Sorry, I won’t tolerate out of control, feral children trashing my neighborhood. Maybe you will, but I won’t. Why don’t you go ask some of the people who have lost loved ones to stray bullets how they feel about gangs?

      If someone is going to have children, they had better show up to raise them. Every single gangbanger I have ever talked to has come from a shit family. Alcoholics, teen moms, drug addicts, abusive, etc. While I’m sympathetic to that, it’s still no excuse to make everyone else’s lives in the neighborhood hell.

      My family came from nothing and made something of their lives. They weren’t perfect but they certainly didn’t go around mugging people, slanging crack or joining up with some pathetic gang to achieve that.

      • Concerned and Interested


        That’s a crazy story – I’m sorry. When did a gang member put a gun to your head? Were you at home or walking in the neighborhood? I can’t even imagine what that would be like. Do you own a firearm?

      • @worf

        I would say tagging is not equivalent to a dog pissing on a hydrant. The dog pissing is AT LEAST performing a necessary bodily function whilst also marking territory.

    • Echo Park resident

      I’ll give these “kids” respect when they start respecting the neighborhood. I don’t buy into the whole “Boo hoo, think of the children!” argument — these “kids” are committing vandalism. Vandalism is a CRIME. Why am I supposed to sit around and let some idiots with spray paint destroy my home? (Oh, and don’t throw the “well you’re white and oppress them” nonsense at me, because I’m Hispanic. White people aren’t the only ones frustrated with all the tagging and destruction of private property.)

  22. White or Hipsters or what ever you call your self . Lets all get along stop your racist BS . You have to understand this isn’t East coast or the middle America , It’s Echo park mixed neighborhood . Yes I do own my own house in EP, yes I am Latin , keep on disrespecting Hispanics , one will CHECK you Cali style ,

    • Key word you used, “mixed”. We are here because we enjoy and want to live in a mixed neighborhood. It seems a lot of the “natives” (whatever that means— you do realize there were Italians, Jews, Russians, etc in Echo Park before you, right?). Also, what is “CHECK” Cali Style? Does that mean you are going to put an avocado on me? Please do explain what it means to be CHECKED? Doesn’t sound very friendly to me.

      • Put an avocado on me? Glad I wasn’t drinking milk when I read that… cause that was funny!

      • I saw today at subway, “Cali style” means Avocado AND Bacon.

        Check me Cali style any time.

        • I tried my hardest to get Cali Styled today. Nothing happened. I could tell, from the looks on the people’s faces, that they knew I wanted them to cover me in Avocado and Bacon.. I’m sure they could tell I wanted to get Cali Styled by that “look” on my face. But then, they got this look on their face which said to me, “we don’t have bacon, but rather a nice chorizo, would that do”. The look on my face must’ve read, “I only like chorizo with huevos.. and a fresh flour tortilla”.. even though I intended the look on my face to say, ” but of course. Do you have any grey poupon?”

    • Concerned and Interested

      Echo park native,

      I’m confused. I always thought gangs were a sub-culture of various cultures. Whites have the KKK and Neo-Nazis (and perhaps Fox News ;-), Blacks have the Bloods and Crips, Hispanics have, well, too many to list. BUT, I never associated the culture as a whole with the gang. As a white person, I am repulsed by the KKK and Neo-Nazis. If there was a way to lock them all up, I would be happy to see it happen. I don’t associate white culture with a negative fringe sub-culture, even if we share the same skin color.

      What I find interesting AND disturbing is how some Hispanic posters seem to associate a hatred for gangs with a biased against Hispanic culture. I also find it disturbing that Hispanic (or presumed Hispanics) people have actually threatened people on these message boards, while simultaneously lobbying for more acceptance/less hatred, etc. (I have never been one to look positively upon someone threatening me – “CHECK you Cali style” – whatever that means?!?)

      My first question for you is: Are you stupid? If so, that explains EVERYTHING – we don’t need to continue this debate.

      If not, then my second question to you or anyone interested in chiming in is: Should I assume that many Hispanic people in Los Angeles look at gangs as part of their culture? If so, how do they justify gangs hurting other people — physically, financially, or through their dealings – drug trafficking, human trafficking, etc.? And finally, as an outsider, WHY am I supposed to be OK with gangs in my neighborhood?

      • C & I – I’ll try to answer your question about gangs in our culture. When you grow up in a community known to have gang activity, you really have no choice but to deal with it. Let me give you an example, drug cartel leader “El Chapo” was recently arrested in Mexico, as you may know. Well, El Chapo is/was a folk hero in that part of Mexico. Now, I ask myself, why would anyone idolize such a person? Well, I probably would never understand, because I don’t live under such conditions. It’s almost an identical situation as a long time EP resident, I don’t like gang activity, but you just learn to live with it, and try my best to not attract trouble. It’s called being Street Smart.
        Now, my previous posts came across as being racists to “whitey” and “hipsters”, and I’ll admit, I was wrong and I apologize. But if you want a better EP, a safer EP, then I would suggest maybe not being racist as well. Maybe not you personally, but it is out there amongst the new EP residences. Don’t stereotype a “Mexican” as Riff Raff, male or female, just because they’re wearing a Dodger jersey. There are many hard working Mexicans still living in the area, don’t make us feel like outsiders in our own neighborhood. Then maybe, you will see change.

        • I’m honestly curious about something:

          how does someone make you feel like an outsider? Do they point and yell “OUTSIDER” when you walk by? Put a post-it note on your back saying the same? Is it more of a “look” or a “feeling” that you get?

          Did you know that NO-ONE can make you feel like an outsider without YOUR permission?

          • You call yourself “True Freedom”, but you’re a “True Coward” hiding behind a keyboard and college degree.
            Cars are being burned around EP, and you’ll see new graffiti every morning around the area, and you wonder if there’s divide in EP?
            I don’t appreciate the vandalism around my area, and I really do enjoy some of my new neighbors. But unfortunately, not every “hispanic” resident feels the same as I do. But I understand their frustrations, we feel like outsiders because we get dirty looks at the laundrymat on Sunset, or El Chango on EP Ave., even the taco truck on a Saturday night.
            I don’t need you to believe me, I’m just telling you how it is. But chances are, you are probably a reason why there is such divide in EP.

          • I’m a coward because I “hide behind a keyboard” on an INTERNET FORUM?
            Ok. Sounds good. And, just to make you feel better, I’m actually hiding behind three college degrees .. all from top tier schools.. which makes me virtually invisible.

            Anyway, I don’t wonder if there’s a divide in EP. From many of the comments from the older residents such as yourself, it seems pretty clear there’s a divide. I’m just curious from your standpoint what is driving that divide.

            Since you don’t really know what someone is thinking when they look at you, could it be that you’re projecting some of your own insecurities or feelings of hatred on the new people? I mean, maybe that grimace on their face is because they are all clenched up or have to poo. Maybe it has nothing to do with you.

            None of my degrees are related to psycho-analysis, so I’m far from an expert, but I think you are actually a little uncomfortable around your new neighbors (much like many white folks were in the 60’s when different ethnicities moved to their neighborhoods). I think to rationalize this discomfort, you make excuses like “they are looking at me funny” or “they don’t respect me or want me here” as if you’re a mind reader.. or there’s some kind of plot for people to buy up properties to squeeze you out. These are convenient excuses for your own feelings. I think you’d be a happier person in life if you spent some time reflecting on this. Just my two cents. Heck, I’m rich.. here’s a nickel.

          • I’m not from Echo Park but I’ve visited it often for over 15 years. I’m Mexican and I’ve seen these looks first hand. Walked into a coffee shop and it might as well have been a scene in a movie where the record scratches. LITERALLY all 10 or so patrons (white) stopped what they were doing and stared at me and my gf like we were about to rob the place. They stopped eating and drinking and stared at us as we walked up to the counter. Do I know what they were thinking? No. Did they make us feel uncomfortable and unwanted? Absolutely.

            All I wanted to do was buy some coffee and maybe try one of their sandwiches. All those people made it super awkward to even walk into the place. I’m glad that place ended up closing down.

            Degree or no degree, these looks are real.

          • @Angeleno : well, I certainly can’t say what they were actually thinking.. but I’ll tell you my story:
            After newly arriving to LA, I went into a restaurant on the west side with a college friend who had also moved out here. She was a very attractive black girl (I’m white). When we walked into the place, we got alot of looks from the people at the tables. Afterwards, she remarked how we got the looks. She thought it was because she’s black. I thought it was because they were wondering, in admiration, what a dufus like me was doing with such a hot woman. We both saw the same people, the same looks.. two totally different interpretations.

          • Depending on what year your incident took place, those looks very well might have been because you were an interracial couple.

            She’s black and she might have been subjected to those looks previously in her life while you might not have. There are different experiences for people of color day to day. Especially black people. You thought one way because you’ve probably never received those looks before, she thought another way because she probably has.

            Regardless, it’s not cool and it shouldn’t be an issue. Sad to say it is though.

          • my point is: the way someone looks at you is totally subject to your interpretation.. and may be far from the reality of the situation. Maybe they thought YOU were looking at them funny first!

            Anyway, go ahead and believe that anyone that looks at you with a less than pleasant look on their face is thinking what a $%#$# you are. I’ll continue to give people the benefit of the doubt until the doubt is removed.

          • You didn’t address my comments about different people actually having different real life experiences. Maybe the black girl you were with was used to receiving those looks because she got them her whole life when she walked into the wrong restaurant or in the wrong neighborhood. You gave people the benefit of the doubt because maybe you weren’t subjected to those glares your whole life.

            The way someone looks at you may be subject to each individual’s interpretation, but there’s a reason behind that interpretation. YOU have lived a different life than the other person has.

            I never said that anyone who looks at me less than pleasant leads me to believe they’re thinking a certain way. I told you my experience about specifically Echo Park and stayed right on subject, I’m not generalizing by any means. And there’s no way they could have thought I looked at them funny, I literally walked in, everyone turned and stared, and I walked up to the counter.

          • @true freedom

            Mr. Freedom, It is futile to attempt to convenience someone like Angelo that what they are seeing isn’t inherently negative. You see, it’s a crutch people like him use as an excuse why they couldn’t… fill in the blank. “I didn’t get the job because I’m brown” instead of “I didn’t get the job because the other guy was more qualified than me – so I’m going to work harder, study harder etc.”

            This attitude runs rampant in the Hispanic and black communities, unfortunately. Want proof that attitude is everything? Look at the Asian and Jewish communities; both minorities yet they seem to have much more success because they focus on themselves, family and education. Not an imagined perception.

            You see Angelo, “the man” isn’t holding you down, that’s your attitude doing that. By the way, perhaps they were staring at you because they admired how you were dressed! Or maybe you had a bugar on your face. Why must it automatically go to race? Stop being your own worst enemy.

          • @Grahm : you’re right, it’s futile. I’m gonna try anyway, though, because there may be “the man” holding Angelo down. Unfortunately, I think that man is Angelo himself.

            @Angelo : of course, each person brings with them their own biases, their own baggage, their own filters through which they interpret things. Which leads exactly to my point: You don’t know what’s behind the looks… you are not, in technical terms, an “unbiased estimator”. You have bias. We all have. So, don’t let your interpretation of things that you can’t possibly know the truth about get you all bunged up. It’s useless. Choose to ignore those little voices in your head. They only limit you and prevent you. The voices are in your head.. you can choose to ignore them.

          • @Grahm @true

            You guys continue to ignore the point that different people have different experiences. I like how you just dismiss my points because they are valid. If you walked into a restaurant and received those glares your whole life, why would the day it currently happened be any different? It wouldn’t. You’d be naive to think they liked the way I was dressed. Your head is in the sand.

            The man isn’t holding me down. Although if you look at history, there is clearly one group of people that “held down” everyone who didn’t LOOK like them. Can you guess which one that is?

            Good stereotypes too. Black and brown people have those attitudes that run rampant in their communities, that’s why they’re poor and undeserved.

            You’re pretty smart in assuming I use a crutch that you described. It’s too bad you’re 100% wrong. I have a great career that I worked my ass off to get. But go ahead and keep assuming and stereotyping that Mexicans and Latinos are lazy criminals that don’t take responsibility for themselves.

            Both your attitudes and comments paint the very sad picture of the feelings of new comers to these neighborhoods. It doesn’t matter how many degrees you have if you’re still ignorant at heart.


            Who’s Angelo?

          • sounds good.
            (thumbs up)

          • Try as you might. There is no arguing against factual statistics.

          • Beverly D'Angeleno

            @Angeleno: Could it simply be that people noticed you because you “looked different” given the context of the environment that you walked into? Could be your ethnicity, and maybe it was. Could be your hair. Could be your clothes. Could be your age. Could be your hot girlfriend. Could be your ugly girlfriend. Could be anything. Sure, this happens to us minorities more than non-minorities (by definition). But it can, and does, happen to anyone. Remember, in some neighborhoods whites are the minority. Ask anyone with a visible deformity or handicap. Look different and people will notice. Different being a relative description. I try not to project anything positive or negative into it. It’s just something that people do. For better or worse. Cursing this is like cursing the tide for rising or the sun for setting.

        • Concerned and Interested


          That’s an interesting perspective. I personally have a good relationship with my Hispanic neighbors (and my Asian and white neighbors too). What’s kinda ironic and blows the “Mexican riff-raff” stereotype out of the water is that the worst neighbor on my street is a toothless, white trash meth-addict – worst neighbor EVER! Maybe we should lobby the city for a meth-head hillbilly injunction too. Nothing good ever comes out a bunch of white trash hillbillies hanging out together.

          So where do you stand on the gang injunction?

          • C & I – Believe it or not, I’m for the injunction. But we’re living in the real world, gangs will always survive in the L.A. area. Most of the riff raff is no longer living in the EP area, but they still visit and claim it.
            I just don’t see a gang injunction making any difference.

        • Jesse,
          El Chapo was a local folk hero in that area in Mexico for the same reason Pablo Escobar was a hero in Columbia. The actions of the cartel(s) act to suppress the people around them psychologically and financially. Then, occasionally the cartel will build a soccer field or a church to become “heroes” to the locals. It’s pretty close to Stockholm Syndrome but on a vast scale.

          The gangs may be playing the same roll in these communities.

  23. Native to these parts

    The gang injunction comes at a time where our state is releasing inmates early due to overcrowding, etc. these inmates are going back to their neighborhoods (ours in this case). Is anyone seeing a decline in graffiti, let alone gang related graffiti? Echo Park saw a decline a few years back, it never went away but there was a significant decline and it’s all coming back ten fold. A new billboard above El Compadre is tagged within a day of being put up, The Short Stop exterior, bathrooms is tagged daily, residences along Portia, La Veta Terrace, Douglas, Lemoyne, Sunset Blvd,, even graffiti at the Angelus Temple parking structure, etc, etc, and now the wall on Scott Ave above? If a police officer wants to stop me to ask questions I’m fine with it, I know better than to act a fool. I’m latino….. .for the gang injunction.

  24. Some of y’all might want to look up the word “hypocrisy”
    The most racist comments come from those complaining about racism.

  25. Sorry, but the skinny jean wearing hipsters, walking around and fixing things up like they own the place, actually kinda own the place. That’s what property ownership is all about. And your landlords, taking advantage of one of the hottest real estate markets in California, are the owners of the neighborhood too. All of the bogoted, long term residents who rent their house and wait for their landlords to fix everything while complaining on here about whitey moving in and showing disrespect are misinformed. Angry threats and bravado only live as long as your body is fit enough to back them up. Then eventually someone who thinks more methodically and peacefully will take your place. You don’t own anything, sorry.

  26. Newsflash: you can’t cry racism then make racist remarks. Is it any wonder that people do not feel sympathy for gang members when their supporters come to an online forum to make threats? Getting “checked”? We should be afraid because the power is out? We are merely guests to the place where we have chosen to BUY property and create our lives?

  27. Children are depending upon us to provide a safe place to live and grow.

  28. As a retired correctional officer who lived in Echo Park for 20 years, I’m all for the injunction. Due to the early release of inmates in Southern California, the young parolees are returning to the area they knew before being incarcerated and this is only going to get worse not only in Echo Park and the surrounding neighborhoods but the entire state due to Federal judges demanding California to release these convicted felons. Believe me the injunction will work unfortunately some of these gangsters no longer live in the area but still come to the area for whatever reason.

  29. From one Latino to the displaced homeboys of Northeast LA –Throwing hard looks is not the same thing as actually the neighborhood you live in. Goodbye losers. Nobody is going to miss you.

  30. I think the gang injunction was a huge mistake people. Now EP/ SL are scarier than ever. I’ve lived in EP for over 10 years and never felt less safe. This morning on my way to coffee, I passed a guy wearing a hoody and a full bandana covering his face- (African American, just mentioning in case anyone else saw)- with his hand in his pocket like he was going to pull out a gun as he walked past me. I got to the coffee shop and learned that there is a now a crack-house/apt. on Sunset between EP and SL, that the cops raided on Easter Sunday. Easter Sunday!!! The guy (maybe same guy I saw) had an arsenal of weapons but because they were locked up and the police didn’t find anything else they didn’t take him into custody! The dynamic is changing and no one is policing the streets (I just talked to officers at 7-11, all they wanted to know is if he threatened me- no he didn’t threaten me, but who covers their entire face at 9 AM in the morning walking down Sunset!) I blame this in the gang injunction– I have seriously never felt this scared walking from EP to SL. Be careful peeps! Things are changing and not for the better.

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