Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Spring Break Camp – Kids Make a Karate Movie in Glassell Park

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Neighborhood favorite Pacific Martial Arts karate school will be offering a movie making camp for kids ages 4 – 10. This camp will coincide with the LAUSD Spring Break that runs from March 30 to April 3 and also during Summer Break from June 8 to June 12.

The focus of the camp will be exploring creativity and learning martial arts skills through the process of making a martial arts movie. The movie will be based on the legend of the origins of karate-do. The story will explain how the Okinawans developed karate-do from Kung Fu (karate originally meant Chinese Fist to the Okinawans) in order to protect their villages from the marauding Ronin!

In addition to daily karate and movement classes, students will learn basic Okinawan weapons techniques. All students will also have the opportunity to learn behind-the-camera skills in their daily “behind the scenes” classes, with special guest instructors providing lessons on screen combat, cinematography, screenwriting  and musical scoring. Lunch and snacks will be provided.

The Movie Camp is limited to the first 30 enrollees. Current students as well as novices are welcome to attend the camp. No prior experience in martial arts is required  since Pacific Martial Arts teaches karate in a safe and non-contact environment. The camp will run from 9 am to 3 pm, March 30 – April 3, with options to extend to 5 pm.

To register for the Movie Camp, please click here.  Parents can also pay per day by clicking here.

For more information, contact

  • (323) 314-3743
  • [email protected]

Philosophy of Character Development

Ponce-Autumnfest-1-smaller-768x1024The camp director, Jason Knight, holds a 3rd-degree black-belt in Washin-Ryu, the core martial art taught at PMA. He has won several championships at local and national martial arts competitions, including the State of California Brick Breaking Challenge and the UC Riverside National Championship in Team Kata. Holding a Master’s Degree in Psychology with over 20 years of experience in the field, Mr. Knight is the leading expert in the process of character development through martial arts training. After working for years in psychology, he developed a method of instruction in karate focusing on helping others develop focus, confidence, leadership and social responsibility.

Washin-Ryu: In Harmony with Nature

IMG_8847-1024x683 While PMA Karate-Do does incorporate several different styles into its curriculum, the core martial art taught is Washin-Ryu, which means “Style in Harmony with Nature.” It focuses on developing harmony, both with the inner self and with fellow students. PMA students achieve harmony through the process of working with one another, either as partners in a drill, or practicing kata (non-contact simulated combat) as a group.

One concept that is highly stressed at PMA dojos is known as the “Clear Mind Concept.” Students are taught to heighten their awareness through active listening, and learn to calm the often noisy mind that can prevent an individual from being able to focus, learn and develop to their full potential. By practicing karate-do and going through conscientious repetition, students learn to listen to their bodies and become more in tune with them.

PMA students who practice long enough also develop a heightened awareness of their surroundings—they have a clear mind and are able to directly experience instead of just reacting to their circumstances based on past experiences or preconceived ideas. Therefore, the ‘harmony’ in Washin-Ryu can refer to being in harmony with the inner nature as well as with natural surroundings.

Developing Social Responsibility and Leadership

Movie-Campp-200K-2 One very important aspect of personal development in PMA karate-do is the Sempai-Kohai relationship. “Sempai” means “senior student” and “kohai” means “junior student”. A sempai’s job is to make his or her kohai feel comfortable, at ease and enthusiastic about learning karate-do. They make sure their kohai is progressing well and offer support and encouragement. As a result, the kohai naturally starts to work harder and give their best. As they increase in rank, this junior student in turn becomes sempai to the newer students, modeling the behavior of their own sempai. In this way, students form strong relationships and develop kindness, social responsibility and leadership skills.

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