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Highland Park couple knows how to party with piñatas

HIGHLAND PARK –– There is no shortage of party supply shops ready to sell you balloons, tables and decorations. But J&R Party, owned by Jesus and Rosina Jimenez,  stands out by making custom-made piñatas, with their York Boulevard shop crowded with paper versions of everything from cartoon characters and hearts to hipster-like figures and scooters.

“I wish they knew how hard it is to make a custom piñata,” Rosina Jimenez said in an interview with City Lab. ” Sometimes people don’t appreciate the work and the little details. The piñatas we have, each one is very unique.”

The City Lab story notes that many of J&R’s custom creations are posted on their Instagram account, #piñataboss. Here’s a sample:

A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

  A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

  A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

  A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

  A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on

  A photo posted by J&R Party (@pinataboss) on



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15 comments

  1. OF COURSE, out of nearly a dozen examples, the Eastsider chose to put the white hipster one on the front page with the headline. Of course they did.

    • Seems like a good example of how an existing NELA business can adapt and thrive in a changing neighborhood.

      • A lot of people actually welcome the change, and smart business owners take advantage of it. People who think like Proper Dos are in the minority.

        Though I do wonder…are they trying to sell that piñata to a hipster, or to someone who wants to imagine beating a hipster with a stick? LOL. Either way, it’s a clever way to work gentrification to your advantage.

    • You are utterly clueless and culturally ignorant. A virtual stereotype of the “evil gentrifier” or “ugly American.” Otherwise, pinatas have historically functioned as tributes to popular, classic, and/or notorious characters but leave it to “Old Gringo” to put a negative spin on this tradition. Are you certain that you want us for neighbors? Did you even consider that logical outcome?!?

      • LOL…PD, you are clueless, and reading ignorant. I was taking a shot that the Eastsider, not at piñatas, or any tradition. You’re so quick in your desire to disparage, you don’t even bother to actually read the comments to which you respond. Get a grip.

      • Oh el douche…… relax…… we are your neighbors now, whether you like it or not. the logical/historical outcome: we win.

  2. By far the coolest is the Darth Vader one

  3. these are awesome !

  4. Not sure why it matters WHAT piñata is highlighted. What matters is these incredible artists making creative and interesting custom pinataa.

  5. Avocado pinata!!

  6. As the writer of the original article on CityLab, I just wanted to chime in and say that the Jimenez family has been an integral part of Highland Park for a very long time. But theirs is a business that has survived on word of mouth, like many of the latino-owned businesses there. Since the gentrification has ramped up, what we’re seeing is a vast disconnect between old-timers and newcomers, with little interaction on a day-to-day basis. Latino families are moving out of the neighborhood, and the original customer base dwindles. Now, I am a white person who lives in HP. But in an effort to be ethical, moral, and really just a good human and neighbor, I reached out to J&R for this interview as one possible small step in bridging the divided neighborhood, and I also wanted to get them more word-of-mouth advertising within the gentrifying community. Plus, I met them and just instantly liked them. Very cool people. So some of you have brought up that business owners embrace the change. I’m here to say that they can only embrace the change if they are embraced right back. Don’t dismiss the mom-and-pop shops that don’t have the fancy signage. Talk to your neighbors. Be an ethical person and neighbor. Remember that change isn’t something that just happens. People need to make that change happen, and if you aren’t conscious of that, the results can be disastrous.

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