Wednesday, October 26, 2016

42-unit apartment building planned next to Historic Filipinotown community center

A 42-unit apartment building would replace one-story homes on Lake Street

A 42-unit apartment building would replace one-story homes on Lake Street

HISTORIC FILIPINOTOWN – A developer is preparing to build a 42-unit apartment building that will rise four stories next to the Lake Street Community Center, according to the City Planning Department.

The apartment building would be located at 241 and 291 N. Lake street in an area of narrow streets about a block south of Temple Street, where developers have been taking advantage of high-density zoning to break ground on numerous new residential projects.

The Lake Street apartments would be constructed on two lots, replacing a 1960s single-family home and a 1911 bungalow, according to county property documents. Both lots sold for a combined $1.150 million in separate transactions earlier this year.

The developer is seeking city permission to build the apartment complex with 38 parking spaces spread over a subterranean garage and parking lot as well as  46 spaces for bicycles, according an online summary.  The project would include a courtyard and a recreation room.

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  1. If they are to be market-rate units, EVERY one of them will end up being shared, so that’s 42 x 2 = 84 cars that need parking.
    The developer is providing 38 spaces.

    There is almost NO extra parking on Lake Street. It’s very tight.

    At least make the number of spaces equal to the number of units… and ensure (I’m looking at YOU, Mr. O’Farrell) that if a portion of the units are deemed “affordable” that they include a spot.

    Also let’s please start counting the number of spaces (4? 5) that disappear from the street when a new development comes in, taking up 2 or 3 lots…

    Ok, end of rant!

    • No one is entitled to free street parking… and there simply isn’t enough room in Central LA for everyone to own a car. Forcing developers to build more parking than the market demands, just means higher rents for tenants (regardless of whether they have a car or not.) Why should new residents be forced to subsidize your private storage?

    • The world has changed. Young people (and you can bet that these new residents will be young) use transit, bikes, and uber to get around.

      Many 20-somethings in LA don’t even have drivers licenses.

      They live in a very different world than you did when you were their age.

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