Friday, October 21, 2016

Why you will not find $40 brie at Whole Food’s 365 store in Silver Lake

A former Ralphs in Silver Lake is being turned into a 365 by Whole Foods market

A former Ralphs in Silver Lake is being turned into a 365 by Whole Foods market

Storefront ReportSILVER LAKE — The grand opening today of Whole Foods in Downtown L.A. attracted a lot of attention and big crowds. But Wall Street investors and supermarket watchers remain more interested in the lower-cost version of Whole Foods the company is planning to open next year in Silver Lake. After revealing very little about the 365 by Whole Foods concept, company co-founder and co-chief executive John Mackey told the New York Times that the new stores will be the equivalent of what Nordstrom Rack is to Nordstrom.

Said Mackey:

“In Whole Foods, you can find a wedge of brie for $2.99, and you can find a wedge of triple crème brie from France that’s made with milk from grass-fed cows that sells for $40 …. You won’t find any $40 brie at 365.”

The company surprised many Silver Lake residents in late July when it announced that it would open a 365 store instead of a traditional Whole Foods in the space once occupied by Ralphs market on Glendale Boulevard.  Though the 365 store, named after the chain’s house brand, will feature a “convenient, streamlined, value-oriented”  concept,  one Silver Lake woman started an online position against the “budget” Whole Foods, reports LAist.

But it looks like Whole Foods, which has taken a beating on Wall Street lately, is focused on its own budget as it prepares to open 365 store  in part to deal with growing competition for organic and natural foods, which are now widely available in such discount giants as Wal-Mart and Target.

According to the New York Times,  the 365 stores “will be less expensive to build, deploy more technology and be more self-service than Whole Foods stores.” In addition, the vast majority of the products at 365 will be selected out of Whole Food’s central offices in Austin, Tex instead of the regional and store level as is the case with traditional Whole Foods stores.  “It’s going to be very different from Whole Foods Market,”  Walter Robb, the company’s other co-executive, told the Times.

The Silver Lake 365 store  is scheduled to open in the second half of 2016.

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  1. Which translates to ” this area still seems kinda ghetto still so we will throw in a store with cheaper stuff and no live checkers, just machines”
    The irony is there’s TONS of people drive to Pasadena or Glendale from Silverlake/Echo Park/Atwater to shop at Whole Foods. I do not understand why this company doesn’t think a REAL Whole Foods would do well. If I want cheap I can go to Trader Joes or Vons! Urgh!

    • So how much you spend on cheese defines you on ghetto or not ? I’ve lived in Echo Park all my life and I’m nor ghetto nor would ever spend $50 dollars on cheese just to confirm I’m not ghetto ! get a fricken grip !
      So insulting to call where i live and where YOU apparently live ghetto ! stop sniveling you unrealistic spoiled crybaby.

  2. The thing is it is such a slap in the face to open the cheap sibling version in SILVER LAKE of ALL communities. If anyone deserves a full service, full amenity AUTHENTIC Whole Foods it is us. Give Glendale the el cheapo 365 Market for Pete’s sake and give us the real thing which is what we were led to believe we would be getting.

    • Why exactly is Silver Lake more deserving of a Whole Foods than Glendale, or anywhere else?


      seriously, lol. stop trollin yall.

    • Unbelievable…listen to how you people sound! Do us all a favor and move to the west side already!!
      This is a prime example of the divide being cast between natives and the transplants…

  3. Lets just wait and see. if its good people will go there if not then they wont. I hope they have the full service lunch area though!

  4. I think it is pretty safe to assume that 365 is going to be stripped down and bare bones. If we are lucky the shelves won’t be as bare as a Soviet grocery store but the expectation is the selection is going to be as dismal. Of course we would all love and EXPECTED to be getting the full service lunch area and many other amenities but apparently that ain’t gonna happen…..

  5. Gee, sounds kind of like Fresh n’ Easy and look what happened there.

  6. Man, you all sound so spoiled! Sounds like you are all living in the wrong neighborhood.

  7. you guys are hilarious..it’s a freakin market..drive down to pasadena or dtla…how miserable are you people to care this much?

    • Having the supermarket that we want means less driving, so many people go on about shopping local, not over utilizing our cars. The residents of Silverlake can afford to shop at Wholefoods. We already have a Trader Joes for budget shopping. A 365 store is more suited to the fringes of Eagle Rock, Glendale and Alhambra.

      • Well this is pretty much the fringes of Silverlake, right where it meets Frogtown. Silverlake already has Gelsons for the people who want to pay too much, and Whole Foods is already getting plenty from the people willing to drive to Glendale. My bet is they looked at the location and realized that the area already had plenty of options that were too expensive, and by getting rid of the Ralphs what they were eliminating was the low to mid-priced option, and there are plenty of those dollars up for grabs from the adjacent neighborhoods.

      • bro. you worried about driving…TRY INSTACART.


    • What’s wrong with people wanting good quality food or not wanting to drive across town to get it? Nothin’ to get riled up about. Talk about miserable!

  8. Dudes, just go to Lassens in Echo Park. It’s fantastic.

  9. Good grief whiners. The entire shopping center is getting a much needed renovation and whole foods is opening a brand new concept store, which from the implied statements will carry whole foods quality products that are value priced. They just opened a regular whole foods downtown. Drive the extra mile for your $40 brie. Ugh.

  10. This place will be what it is. It will take awhile for people to figure out it’s price differential and whether is ‘worth it’ to them. I also think it will have low turnout for quite awhile (after initial opening) because most people will assume it to be another expensive “whole paycheck” and those that do have their “whole paycheck” to spend will avoid it at first because it’s not the “real deal” in their opinion.

    Bottom line: give them a chance to prove themselves, then judge. I live very close and will by default use it for emergency/last minute things but will continue to go to my regular value stores like TJ’s

  11. What idiot wants to PAY MORE FOR FOOD? Expensive or cheap, it all comes out in the end. Be careful you don’t get it on your iWatch when you wipe.

    • Wipe? What idiot WANTS TO WIPE? I paid good money for that food so it’s going to stick around as long as possible. Money spent on toilet paper goes right down the drain.

  12. So much status anxiety on display here. This is not a judgement on Silver Lake. It’s about Whole Foods trying to remake their reputation as a boutique outfit featuring giant stores with amenities like olive bars. They are rather frantically backpedaling from that model. For the consensus take on the plight of WFM, see (e.g.): http://finance.yahoo.com/news/why-whole-foods-shares-plunged-161004975.html — or check their stock ticker for the last 2 years.

    Again: this is not about Silver Lake.

    • It is about Silver Lake because it affects Silver Lake residents. They didn’t decide to downgrade the DTLA Whole Foods or the Pasadena one or even the Glendale one.

      • Clearly those stores are already built, and this one is not. It’s a lot easier to pivot on something that’s only in the planning phase than something that’s already open or about it be.
        When PW says it’s not about Silverlake, I think the intent is that it’s not some judgement against Silverlakers as being poor people or something. It’s not personal, it’s business.

      • Its not a ‘downgrade’. Whole Foods went through some self-assessment due to some heavy downward trends in revenue and realized their business model was out of synch with the times. The 360 version is not a downgrade, its just a way to bring back customers with less high end product and, thus, more economical – but still good quality and organic and yaddda yadda – choices. I imagine, with the exception of a few unbelievable snobs like the ones posting here, this 360 market will be embraced by the Silver Lake community and do great.

  13. I miss dirty ralphs 🙂

  14. They probably chose Silver Lake because we have one of the busiest Trader Joe’s in the region. However, I am very disappointed that they won’t have the amenities which I wanted like full lunch service, restaurant, wine bar, etc. I think that would have done very well in Silver Lake. Look at Silver Lake Wine.

  15. Unlike Gelson’s who have taken the time to get to know and understand who the community they are serving is, and are in fact expanding the list of upscale amenities that they will be providing, the corporate powers that be at Whole Fools decided to insult us from the start by experimenting on OUR COMMUNITY with a stripped down el cheapo market. Maybe the big wigs flew in from Texas and misconstrued our chill bohemian vibe for a low rent neighborhood when really there is a great deal of affluence, and dare I say cultural influence, in our hills. Between this insulting move and the bigoted politics of Lassen’s all I can say is thank goodness for Gelson’s and Trader Joe’s. We’ve been doing JUST FINE with those two and I have a feeling most of us will continue to do just fine with our old dependable friends.

  16. As long as they carry the same level of produce why complain? Trader Joe’s produce is low quality an there are plenty of local businesses supplying wine, cheese, olives etc. Is it not better to support local businesses over a corporate entity? Is that not a Silverlake value? There are plenty of nice local lunch spots as well. This is really a non issue!

  17. Wow people, we’re going to freak out because it’s not a “real” whole foods. Go and volunteer at a food pantry and soup kitchen and then complain about which grocery store is moving into the neighborhood. Seriously what a bunch of over-entitled whiners.

  18. I can afford Whole Foods (well, once in a while), but frankly, I am excited to see what a 365 has to offer. I am sure it wont be as robust as a Whole Foods proper, but why are people acting like its going to be a Super A? Aren’t you intrigued to see what value-conscious whole Foods means? I am.

  19. It’s a certainty that whole foods did. 10000 times more market research than anyone posting on this thread

  20. I’m sure they’ll get the $40 brie eventually, if enough customers demand it. I think that over time this store will morph to properly suit the needs of the community. Or at least they’ll be able to special order things, like a real Whole Foods.

  21. I just can’t believe market research revealed that Silver Lake residents could possible want organic products at decent prices.

    • Remember that the largest runs of food poisoning have been from organic products, and sold by Whole Foods. Check out J. I. Rodale, a big organic food pusher – On June 7, 1971, Jerome Irving Rodale appeared on “The Dick Cavett Show.” The elder statesman of a growing organic food trend, he gushed about the health benefits of his diet, boasting that he “never felt better” and that he “decided to live to a hundred.” But after a commercial break, as Cavett interviewed his second guest, what sounded like a loud snore rose from Rodale’s end of the couch. The audience twittered, thinking that he was pulling a prank. But Cavett knew. When he looked over at Rodale’s bloodless pallor and gaping mouth his suspicion was confirmed—America’s most famous natural-health figure was dead of a heart attack at 72. This, after saying he would live to be 100, if a meat-eating cabdriver didn’t run him down and kill him. His lifestyle (organic foods), did.

  22. The neighborhood envy will die down once people realize you’ll be able to order a mendocino farms sandwich while you pickup essentially 95% of anything you would normally by from whole foods at a better price.

  23. Mostly it is just that Whole Foods corporate have demonstrated such tone deafness in their approach to us that really gets under my skin. I’m sure they came in assuming we are just another location in larger Los Angeles while really we are a neighborhood, a community, a lifestyle, and most of all a movement. It is because we care just a little bit more that our property values are sky high and everyone wants to move here just as it is because we love our children just a little bit more that our schools, especially Ivanhoe are the successes that they are. Come on Whole Foods, we give our best day in day out, don’t you think that when you come into our home you should do the same?

    • Do you hear yourself? Let’s put aside the fact that you are complaining about a supermarket that has not actually been built yet. If you are so concerned about the Silver Lake community and “lifestyle”, why not do your shopping at Silver Lake Wine, the cheese shop, the farmers market, etc etc. PLACES THAT ARE ACTUALLY PART OF THE COMMUNITY.

      You really think areas with schools that aren’t Ivanhoe love their children less? Seriously, who are you?

  24. Does anyone know when the Sprouts on Eagle Rock Blvd. is supposed to open?

  25. Last word for those who think that ‘organic’ is of any value, other than snob value. Back in the 1950s they started to put BHT (Butylated hydroxytoluene) in boxed cereals. Of course there was an uproar from the ‘organic community’. However, the result was that stomach cancer had a major decline because it was mold forming on the cereal that caused the cancer and the BHT killed off the mold. And, finally, the world could not be sustained by organic farming. Billions would starve if this form of agriculture was adopted. Read the interviews with centenarians. Many report that they eat bacon every day, do not exercise at all, and drink lots of alcohol. Charlie Smith, who died at 114, quit smoking at 112. Stop living the snob BS, Silver Lake does not need you thinking that you are right and are ‘special’ (except perhaps special ed).

  26. As the famous quote goes, “let them eat $40 Brie!” 🙂

  27. I no longer care what they open there. I gave up on that entire shopping center due to the parking situation. Unless you can get there mid-day during a weekday, not worth the trouble. Especially without the variety of businesses that used to occupy this space. Depending on my need or craving, I make the trip to Glendale, Cypress Park, or Glendale. The entire commercial scene in EP and SL has become disjointed, unpredictable, and scatter-brained. Shopping for basic groceries shouldn’t be such an “adventure.”

  28. Of course the ultimate irony is that anyone who actually knows the ‘hood and enjoyed time at our gorgeous restaurants, cafes, and shops over the past weekend knows how much of a celebrity enclave we have become. Of course OUR celebs are by nature low key so the powers that be at Whole Foods wouldn’t have seen our little burg on TMZ and the like. I truly believe they are making a fatal business mistake by giving us low rent instead of upscale…….

    • Enjoying armpit hair’s comments, if that truly is your name. A subtle, refined trolling expedition. Nicely played for a “concern” such as this…

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