Saturday, October 22, 2016

Preservationists win one in Silver Lake, lose one in Echo Park

Silver Lake home being restored

Silver Lake home being restored

A Craftsman bungalow in Silver Lake once threatened with demolition is now in the process of being restored. But the story is different on the eastern edge of Echo Park, where a demolition crew showed up today in front of a 117-year-old with a sagging roof that a developer wants torn down.

Neighbors had met with developer Brad Weinstock to talk about ways to relocate or restore, salvage or relocate the home at 1003 N. Everett Street. The home, built in 1899, is one of the few remaining hilltop Victorian- and Craftsman-era homes that were built more than a century ago around Everett Park . Weinstock told The Eastsider last year that he and his partners want to build a 50-unit apartment complex with subterranean parking on the site of the home and an adjacent lot.

Apparently discussions to save the house went no where. Residents tipped off The Eastsider about a demolition crew showing up in front of the property this morning. When asked if demolition was going to start today, one worker said “probably.”

Meanwhile, in Silver Lake, a crew of workers were in the process of restoring, not tearing down,  a 105-year-old Craftsman home that sits on a bluff high over Sunset Boulevard. The property owners had planned to demolish the Coronado Terrace home for what neighbors said would have been a small-lot development. But preservationists got involved and were able to have the property declared a city cultural historic monument, which makes demolition or exterior changes much more difficult.

The property’s stone retaining walls, which can also be found on neighboring properties on Coronado and Sunset, are one of the key reasons that made the 1910 home worth preserving, according to the historic monument application. The home, one of the first built in the Rowland Heights Tract, sits in what city planners call The Coronado Planning District, which is defined by a “rare and largely-intact concentration of arroyo stone retaining walls … that produce a uniform street scape and distinctive sense of place.”

Instead of tearing it down, the property owners are now in the process of restoring the home, according to a preservationist involved in the matter. The clapboard siding has been repaired and repainted while the repairs have also been made to sections of the stone retaining wall. The Eastsider will provide more updates when the project gets further along.

Echo Park house scheduled for demolition

Echo Park house scheduled for demolition

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  1. Great. Now it’s gonna suck going to Everett park now. Gonna be full of hipsters.

  2. Ethan Hawke punched Dr. Dre on that street.

  3. 50 units, and the city says we can’t get a traffic light at Everett and Sunset. Great….

  4. Well should also mention why the Everett house’s roof is in that condition Got that way when the developer tried to illegally demolish the house a few months back. This project is a terrible shortsighted mistake.

  5. Im pretty sure they are not going to hand wreck the spot (via the method they are permitted to do).

    If you wanna stir up the pot then as soon as you see them using machines document it, get someone from the city down, and get them fined/ stalled. Fuck this company.


  6. 20 yrs.ago the Echo Park Historical Society would have been all over this.
    What ever became of the ECHO PARK HISTORICAL SOCIETY?

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