Quantcast

Glassell Park Transit Pavilion will offer shade and respect for bus riders

glassell park transit pavilion

GLASSELL PARK —  Work is scheduled to begin this summer on a long-awaited Glassell Park Transit Pavilion that will provide shade and seating for bus riders who wait on a traffic island bounded San Fernando Road and Eagle Rock Boulevard.

The idea of the shelter was first proposed more than a decade ago by neighborhood activists and a group of SCI-Arc student architects. Since the concept was conceived, a new high school has been built across the street from the traffic island while a new apartment complex has been constructed nearby, increasing the number of potential bus riders. City officials had backed the project but had not been able to secure sufficient funds to get it built.

But late last month, Council District 1 and the Bureau of Engineering announced that additional grant money had been secured to help pay for the $560,000 transit pavilion. Renderings of the final design that was selected by residents and officials showed a trio of canopies similar to the concept first proposed by SCI-Arc students. In addition to the canopies, the project will include benches, security lighting, landscaping as well as sidewalk and curb repairs.  The words “Cypress Park – Glassell Park” will be included in the pavement.

Helene Schpak, one of the neighborhood activists who has been involved in the project, welcomed the news.

“After 12 years of effort to bring a thoughtfully and aesthetically designed pavilion to the transit island, I am pleased that we’re finally respecting the many daily commuters  who this transportation hub by providing the basic seating and shade that has been long awaited,” she said via email.  For those of us who have been working for this necessary amenity in Glassell Park all this time, it’s satisfying to know that something will be realized.”

Construction start date to be late July 2016 with completion date by July 2017, according to Council District 1.

Support The Eastsider Today

Bloggers don’t live on comments alone. You can support The Eastsider, a privately-owned company, by purchasing an annual Reader Sponsorship. Your financial support and sponsorship will help defray the costs of gathering neighborhood news and stories. You can pay via PayPal or by using your credit or debit card. Your sponsorship is not tax deductible. Just click on the button below to select a sponsorship level and sign up today.

The Eastsider offers three levels of Reader Sponsorships:

$25 Reader Sponsorship

  • Get An Eastsider Reader Benefits Card that entitles you to deals and discounts from neighborhood merchants
  • You will be thanked by name on the blog and recognized as a sponsor of The Eastsider

$50 Reader Sponsorship

  • Get An Eastsider Reader Benefits Card that entitles you to deals and discounts from neighborhood merchants
  • You will be thanked by name on the blog and recognized as a sponsor of The Eastsider
  • Complementary Eastsider postcards

$100 Reader Sponsorship

  • Get An Eastsider Reader Benefits Card that entitles you to deals and discounts from neighborhood merchants
  • You will be thanked by name on the blog and recognized as a sponsor of The Eastsider.
  • Complementary Eastsider postcards
  • One-month advertisement promoting the nonprofit, school or charity of your choice located or active in our coverage area (email us for details).
Fill out my online form.

Thanks for your support!
Jesús Sanchez, The Eastsider LLC

Click here if you are having trouble viewing this form



Eastsider Advertising

9 comments

  1. How can a few boards on top of four polls cost %560,000!? And other than that, mostly empty concrete?

    • Look closer at the rendering. It’s been re-landscaped, and looks like it has fresh brick/tiles.

      I mean, $560,000 seems loco to me, too. But I’m guessing that includes the design costs.

  2. I look at this rendering and I can’t help buy think that the people behind this are either robots or intentionally trying to humiliate transit riders.

    Yes, shade is nice *BUT* at a busy transit stop, and for this kind of money, where are the bathrooms? Where is the TAP card ticket vending machine?

    The way this stop is designed it is clear that this isn’t about transit users comfort – this is about making something that people driving by in cars can say “Oh, look how nice!”

    You ever ride a bus with a kid or an elderly family member who needs to go to the bathroom? You ever run out of transit fare when you have no cash and less than $10 on your debit card? Come on Metro, come on LA, stop messing around and start designing for humans.

  3. Additionally, all that shade – but where is the seating underneath this shade? Oh, the seating is out on the periphery, where there is no shade.

    And those benches? Please.

    Those were shown to be design failures back in the 1980’s and earlier – they are ornamentation for architectural renderings, not benches that aid socialization, positive human contact, or happiness.

  4. And where the heck is the bike parking?!

  5. I’ve never ridden a metro bus but this looks like a very nice amenity for those who do. It is amazing how people show up to complain about anything.

    • I’ve never flown a helicopter but I think they should have a 35 mph speed limit. People will complain about anything.

  6. Materials alone including concrete wouldn’t amount up to $100,000. Design hours at $100/hr (where do I sign up?) wouldn’t be more than 600 hrs given they’re mostly existing designs. Labour another $100,000. These are just super swag figures amounting to $260,000.

    Where’s the other $300,000??!! Just leaves me wondering how inefficient or corrupt some of the

Post a Comment

Please keep your comments civil and on topic and refrain from personal attacks. The moderator reserves the right to edit or delete any comments. The Eastsider's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy apply to comments submitted by readers. Required fields are marked *

*