Thursday, October 20, 2016

Sinking Little League snack stand in Elysian Park to be demolished

Bishop Canyon Restroom Building | Barry Lank

Bishop Canyon Restroom Building | Barry Lank


The snack stand that has slowly been sinking into the ground at the Northeast Los Angeles Little League field in Elysian Park is finally slated for demolition – tentatively starting in the fall. But the snack stand/restroom will probably be replaced with a trailer rather than a building, city officials say.

“We have been working on this for the past three years,” said Fredy Ceja, communications director for Councilmember Gilbert Cedillo, “after multiple attempts to find a buildable site, without success.”

A recent work order from the city Bureau of Engineering officially calls for the Bishop Canyon Restroom Building to be demolished, and for portions of the baseball field to be reconstructed.

Ceja called the likely replacement “an enhanced trailer alternative”  while Sergio Villasenor, president of the Northeast Los Angeles Little League, described it as more like a convertible shipping container.

“Whatever works, that’s the best solution to our problem,” Villasenor said, noting that the snack bar is the league’s only source of revenue at the park. The league couldn’t make any money there last season when the unstable structure was closed up, Villasenor said.

The playing fields of the Northeast Los Angeles Little League were built on landfill atop Elysian Park. Villasenor said the group was told some settling could be expected after they began using the city-owned fields and snack stand in the late 1990s. But over the last few years, the settling has left the building visibly tilted towards the baseball field.

A recent on-site report from the BOE estimated the total cost of demolition and reconstruction could be approximately $1 million. The report also said demolition might start in November and would take about six months, while rehabilitation of the site would also take about six months.

“Hopefully was can also add lights to the park,” Villasenor said. “But that’s another expense.”

Northeast Little League President Sergio Villasenor pictured in 2014

Northeast Little League President Sergio Villasenor pictured in 2014

Barry Lank grew up in the San Gabriel Valley, then went away for a seriously long time. He has worked in TV and radio, and currently helps produce The Final Edition Radio Hour.

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One comment

  1. I don’t mind Little League using those fields. But I find it very wrong that everyone else is barred from using them, even though these fields are paid for by the public and on public park land. These fields should be open to anyone to use, although perhaps a reserved time for when a Little League game is scheduled.

    Outside that small amount of reserved time, these fields should be available to anyone to play a pickup game or other use. Anything else is to effectively privatize public parks land — except the expense to the public is not privatized. But sine being built, they are gated and locked off from public use.

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