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Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Super-sized Echo Park development headed for Temple Street

alexan

Rendering of the Alexan South Echo | Courtesy Trammell Crow

ECHO PARK — An afternoon ground breaking ceremony is planned for today, Oct. 27, for the newest and largest apartment project on Temple Street: the Alexan South Echo. With five floors, 200 apartments and nearly 22,000-square-feet of retail space spread over 1.7-acres, the Alexan South Echo is so far the largest project to get underway on Temple in recent years.

The developer, Trammell Crow Residential, is going to build the complex in the 1900 block of Temple once occupied by the Derby Dolls roller rink, and, way before that, an ice cream cone plant.  Rents at the development, which would include amenities ranging from a swimming pool to a dog washing/grooming station, would range from $1,700 to $3,900 for a combination of studios and one- and two-bedroom units.

There has been a wave of new new housing rising or planned on or near Temple (check out this map). Three blocks east of the Alexan South site, a four-story, 69-unit apartment building is currently under construction while crews are building a 47-unit complex a few blocks to the west.

Residents have expressed concern that these apartment buildings are too big for the area and could lead to more traffic congestion and competition for scarce street parking. But developers have been attracted to the Temple corridor because they can take advantage of the generous zoning in the area. Some of these developments have targeted tenants who are looking for relatively affordable – and newer – alternatives to pricier places north of the 101.

Screenshot 2015-12-10 at 3.10.51 PM

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Jesús Sanchez, Publisher
The Eastsider

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19 comments

  1. And all not under rent control! Yes, that’s right, more power to the corporate landlords! Ridiculous!
    Rent control for ALL apartments or no rent control at all!

  2. It’s not the prettiest building, but it’ll be good for the area.

  3. as a person who lives right across the street this is really upsetting and totally out of place for this neighborhood. I am so over this.

  4. I agree with Mike. This is in a corridor well-served by transit and bicycling, that already has higher density development, and the new neighbors will add to the diversity of the neighborhood!

    I would also note this new report by McKinsey that finds LA County has between 5,600 and 8,900 multifamily parcels that are currently vacant. We need more development, not less,

    http://la.curbed.com/2016/10/27/13424500/housing-shortage-development-california-los-angeles

    • I always love the throw away line about new neighbors adding to the diversity. Like this is a homogenous area? How much more diversity do we need? We Are Diverse!

      • Demographics for Echo Park (Historic P-Town included) in 2010 show: 59.5% Latino, 23.2% White, 13.3% Asian, etc. So I assume a more diverse area would look more like an equal representation of all races. Something with a breakdown of say… 25% Latino / 25% White / 25% Asian / 25% Black is what we would consider a balanced diverse neighborhood, right?

  5. What?!

    “Some of these developments have targeted tenants who are looking for relatively affordable – and newer – alternatives to pricier places north of the 101.

    Rents at the development, which would include amenities ranging from a swimming pool to a dog washing/grooming station, would range from $1,700 to $3,900 for a combination of studios and one- and two-bedroom units.”

    • Can they just PLEEEEASE hire architects with STYLE???
      Yuck! It’s looks like Orsini-lite. Ugh. I’m not opposed to development, but it’s so rare to see a new complex with a true sense of timeless style. Looks like “The Bride of Palmer!”

      • Seriously. Why does everything look like this nowadays? How did everything built between the 1920s and 1950s have so much incredible style in LA? What happened?

        • Buildings pre-1950 were built to human scale with a need to attract residents instead of accommodate massive influx. Architecture, the art and science of accommodating people.

          Nowadays, buildings are designed for vehicles and often times 25-35% of the gross floor area is dedicated to parking cars and access ways for vehicles. This is called parkitecture, the science of accommodating machines. Subsequently, the dedication of 1/3 of a building to vehicles drives both the cost of construction up and minimizes yield by reducing from the rentable space. To further exacerbate the problem, developers no longer have to attract tenants because we’ve fallen so far behind in meeting the demand for housing that a developer could slap up some garbage project and it would still get leased up because of how quickly our city is growing and how relatively slowly our city is building.

          • This.

            All those charming pre-war urban buildings we know and love (small footprint, no setback, no parking) are virtually illegal to build today.

            And of course, the same neighbors who complain about high rents and traffic congestion will be begging the developers to build even more parking.

            Windshield perspective really dulls the mind.

          • Thank you, Mike

      • Becky with the good hair

        Alex K,
        You and others often have the same complaint about new developments. I am curious about what exactly your expectation is. Would you share an example of a multi unit complex that has “style” that appeals to you?

        It’s very easy to just complain, but if you actually provide a solution along with that complaint you may get some momentum behind you.

    • $1700 for a studio surrounded by 350 other Tennants. But hey there’s a pool.

  6. Do people hate it because they can’t afford it? They get filled up fast so plenty of people love these new condos. We’ll continue to see them slowly pop up all over.

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