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Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Atwater Village program to nurture kids and native gardens

Taking the Reins urban barn | Courtesy Diane Kelber

ATWATER VILLAGE — The nonprofit Taking The Reins has brought many at-risk girls from dense neighborhoods to its barns, corrals and urban farm next to the L.A. River, where the young women build confidence working with horses and learning about horticulture. Now, the group is teaming up with the Theodore Payne Foundation to show the girls the benefits of native plants

On Saturday, Jan. 14,   a “Community Seeding Event” will serve as the kick-off event for the new joint program, which is intended to introduced the adolescent girls to native plant horticulture, conservation and stewardship of the land in urban areas.

The program, consisting of a series of classes spread over two years,  will culminate in “re-wilding” the river corridor and the creation of a permanent native plant garden near the North Atwater Village stables where Taking The Reigns is based.

“Children with limited access to nature will learn about the native species of plants and stewardship of TTR’s portion of the Los Angeles River corridor,” according to a statement. “Demonstration gardens will be designed and planted at Taking the Reins. The gardens will be open to the public as TTR and TPF reintroduce native species to areas located at Taking the Reins’ portion of the river corridor in the Atwater Village area, where native plants have been driven out.”

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3 comments

  1. Sounds like a great program. Thanks for this story.

  2. Sounds strange!
    Native children will be taught proper stewardship of the native plants they and their parents have recognized as native landscape by people who are not native?

    And they have been displaced by these non-native agriculturist?

    Wait, I read it wrong! “…Atwater Village area, where native PLANTS have been driven out.”

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