Dead fish in Lincoln Park Lake, cropped

Dead carp at Lincoln Park Lake

Lincoln Heights - There's a plan to clean up the water and dead fish in Lincoln Park Lake, but, among other things, it will mean draining the lake and 18 months of construction.

The Board of Recreation and Parks Commissioners are scheduled to review the $18.6 million water quality improvement project at their meeting today. The Lincoln Park project -- which would involve cleaning up the lake and landscaping several nearby streets -- and eight other locations throughout the city are to receive funds through Measure W, a parcel tax to support the cost of stormwater-related projects and activities.

Lincoln Park Lake has been out of compliance for water quality since 2012, according to the statement submitted to Rec and Parks. The result has been dead fish, algae blooms, and other problems.

Aside from draining the lake in order to remove the sediment, proposed improvements would include getting more oxygen into the water - with better lake aeration and recirculation systems, a new fountain aerator, and a bottom diffused system that releases oxygen directly into the water column at precise locations in the lake.

A garden would also be planted north of the lake in an area that was recently cleared of turf. Improvements and bioswales are to be developed at the lake edge.

The project is also calculated to include streets immediately to the west of the lake, which are to be altered to capture stormwater and better connect with the park.

Lincoln Park Lake Greening Project

The Lincoln Park Lake project would also include landscaping several streets to the west of the park to capture storm water.

A garden would also be planted north of the lake in an area that was recently cleared of turf. Improvements and bioswales are to be developed at the lake edge.

The project is also calculated to include streets immediately to the west of the lake, which are to be altered to capture stormwater and connect with the park.

The project is estimated to take nearly five years to complete, including more than two years of planning, pre-design, design, and procurement, before construction even begins. The proposal does not make clear how long the lake would remain drained.


A Note From The Publisher

Community News Matters: Support The Eastsider Fall Fundraiser

Thank you to all the readers who helped us get through the past six months by donating and becoming Eastsider sponsors. Your generosity, along with a grant from Facebook, allowed us to continue bringing you breaking news, features and extensive coronavirus coverage. 

But we still need your help. To continue producing this website, we will need to rely much more heavily than in the past on support from readers like you. For that reason, The Eastsider has launched a fall fundraiser.

Please consider giving so that we can keep the Eastsider appearing on your phone, laptop and desktop computer. We’re determined to keep you informed and connected to your community.

Please make your contribution by filling out the form below or click or tap here.

Sincerely, 

Jesús Sanchez, Publisher

  • The Eastsider
Load comments